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Fernando Botero And His Remakes Of Classic Masterpieces

20th century

Fernando Botero And His Remakes Of Classic Masterpieces

I must tell you something in secret – I love Fernando Botero’s works.

There is something really interesting in his paintings. This Colombian figurative artist and sculptor, born in Medellín in 1932 (yes, that Medellín from “Narcos”!) has his signature style, also known as “Boterismo”. “Boterismo” depicts people and figures in large, exaggerated volume, which can represent political criticism or humor, depending on the piece. He is considered the most recognized and quoted living artist from Latin America, and his art can be found in highly visible places around the world, such as Park Avenue in New York City and the Champs-Élysées in Paris.


Botero loves to be inspired by classic art. Or maybe “inspiration” is a wrong word here – for me, Botero paints remakes of famous paintings. Just look:

1. La Fornarina, after Raphael

Fernando Botero masterpieces Fernando Botero, La Fornarina After Raphael, 2009, private collection

Fernando Botero, La Fornarina After Raphael, 2009, private collection

Fernando Botero masterpieces Raphael, La Fornarina, 1518-20, Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica

Raphael, La Fornarina, 1518-20, Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Antica

2. La Menina, after Velasquez

Fernando Botero's works Fernando Botero, La Menina (After Velazquez), 1982, private collection

Fernando Botero, La Menina (After Velazquez), 1982, private collection

Fernando Botero masterpieces Diego Velazquez. Las Meninas (the Maids of Honor). 1656. Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado.

Diego Velazquez. Las Meninas (the Maids of Honor). 1656. Madrid, Museo Nacional del Prado.

3. The Arnolfini Portrait, after van Eyck

Fernando Botero's works After the Arnolfini Van Eyck (2), 1978 - Fernando Botero

Fernando Botero, The Arnolfini Portrait 2 (after Van Eyck), 1978, private collection

Fernando Botero masterpieces Jan van Eyck. Giovanni Arnolfini and His Wife (the Arnolfini Portrait). 1434. The National Gallery, London.

Jan van Eyck. Giovanni Arnolfini and His Wife (the Arnolfini Portrait). 1434. The National Gallery, London.

4. Mademoiselle Caroline Riviere, after Ingres

Fernando Botero's works Fernando Botero, Mademoiselle Caroline Riviere (after Ingres ), 1979, private collection

Fernando Botero, Mademoiselle Caroline Riviere (after Ingres ), 1979, private collection

Fernando Botero masterpieces Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, Mademoiselle Caroline Riviere, 1806, Louvre

Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, Mademoiselle Caroline Riviere, 1806, Louvre

5. Battista Sforza, after Piero della Francesca

Fernando Botero's works Fernando Botero, Battista Sforza (after Piero della Francesca), 1998, private collection

Fernando Botero, Battista Sforza (after Piero della Francesca), 1998, private collection

Fernando Botero masterpieces Piero della Francesca, Battista Sforza, c. 1465–70. Uffizi

Piero della Francesca, Battista Sforza, c. 1465–70, Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

6. Federico da Montefeltro, after Piero della Francesca

Fernando Botero's works Fernando Botero, Federico da Montefeltro (after Piero della Francesca), 1998, private collection

Fernando Botero, Federico da Montefeltro (after Piero della Francesca), 1998, private collection

Fernando Botero masterpieces Piero della Francesca, Federico da Montefeltro, c. 1472, Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

Piero della Francesca, Federico da Montefeltro, c. 1472, Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

7.

Fernando Botero masterpieces Fernando Botero, Rubens and His Wife, 1965, private collection Fernando Botero's works

Fernando Botero, Rubens and His Wife, 1965, private collection

Fernando Botero masterpieces Peter Paul Rubens. Peter Paul Rubens - The Artist and His First Wife, circa 1609, Alte Pinakothek Munich

Peter Paul Rubens. Peter Paul Rubens – The Artist and His First Wife, circa 1609, Alte Pinakothek Munich

8. Mona Lisa, after Leonardo da Vinci

Fernando Botero masterpieces Fernando Botero, Mona Lisa, 1978, Botero Museum Bogota Colombia Fernando Botero's works

Fernando Botero, Mona Lisa, 1978, Botero Museum Bogota Colombia


 

Fernando Botero masterpieces Mona Lisa, Leonardo da Vinci, 1503, Louvre Museum

Leonardo da Vinci, Mona Lisa, 1503, Louvre Museum

 

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Art Historian, huge fan of Giorgione and Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres. Founder and CEO of DailyArtMagazine.com and DailyArt mobile app. But to be honest, her greatest accomplishment is being the owner of Pimpek the Cat.

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