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Japanese Woodblock Prints Ukiyo-e With Snow And Winter

Eastern world

Japanese Woodblock Prints Ukiyo-e With Snow And Winter

Woodblock prints were initially used as early as the eighth century in Japan to disseminate texts, especially Buddhist scriptures In 1765, new technology made it possible to produce single-sheet prints in a whole range of colors. Woodblock printing had been used in China for centuries to print books, long before the advent of movable type, but was widely adopted in Japan during the Edo period (1603-1868).

The medium quickly gained popularity, and was used to produce affordable prints as well as books. It also became very popular among 19th century European artists, but that’s subject should have a separate article.


Ukiyo-e genre of art flourished in Japan from the 17th through 19th centuries. The term translates as “picture[s] of the floating world”. Its artists produced woodblock prints and paintings of such subjects as female beauties; kabuki actors and sumo wrestlers; scenes from history and folk tales; travel scenes and landscapes; flora and fauna; and erotica. Sometimes, these woodblocks also presented snow and winter.

 

Koitsu, Snow at Miyajima, 1937

Koitsu, Snow at Miyajima, 1937

Hiroshige, Meguro Drum Bridge and Sunset Hill, 1857

Hiroshige, Meguro Drum Bridge and Sunset Hill, 1857

Suzuki Harunobu, Children rolling a large snowball, and eating some as they go. (Print by Suzuki Harunobu

Suzuki Harunobu, Children rolling a large snowball, and eating some as they go, 1770

Hasui, Saishoin Temple in Snow, 1936

Hasui, Saishoin Temple in Snow, 1936

Kikugawa Eizan Title:Beauty and Children in Winter

Kikugawa Eizan, Beauty and Children in Winter, 1810

Harunobu Suzuki, Courtesan Watching Two Kamuro Make a Snow Dog, 1767-68

Harunobu Suzuki, Courtesan Watching Two Kamuro Make a Snow Dog, 1767-68

Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Giant snow cat, 1847-50

Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Giant snow cat, 1847-50

Utagawa Hiroshige, One Hundred Famous Views of Edo, 1856–59

Utagawa Hiroshige, One Hundred Famous Views of Edo, 1856–59


Art Historian, huge fan of Giorgione and Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres. Founder and CEO of DailyArtMagazine.com and DailyArt mobile app. But to be honest, her greatest accomplishment is being the owner of Pimpek the Cat.

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