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Best Party Posters of 19th Century

Post-Impresionism

Best Party Posters of 19th Century

Are you ready for the crazy party tonight?

Although lithography was invented in 1798, it was at first too slow and expensive for poster production. Most posters were wood or metal engravings with little color or design.

This all changed with Jules Cheret. Called the father of modern poster he invented “3 stone lithographic process” in the 1880s, a breakthrough which allowed artists to achieve every color in the rainbow with as little as three stones – usually red, yellow and blue – printed in careful registration. An extremely gifted artist as well, Cheret created more than 1000 posters over a 30 year career. Most of them advertised cabarets, theatre plays, alcohol, cigarettes… everything we need to be in mood for a crazy New Year’s party!

Here they are – ten 19th century party posters that will make you feel like dancing, created by geniuses of 1890s – Cheret, Toulouse-Lautrec, Mucha and many others. Enjoy!

1. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Confetti

Posters 19th century Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Confetti, 1894, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Confetti, 1894, Metropolitan Museum of Art

2. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Jane Avril

Posters 19th century Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Jane Avril, 1893, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Jane Avril, 1893, Metropolitan Museum of Art

3. Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Moulin Rouge

Posters 19th century Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec: Moulin Rouge: La Goulue, 1891, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec: Moulin Rouge: La Goulue, 1891, Metropolitan Museum of Art

4. Marcello Dudovich, Mele Napoli

Posters 19th century Marcello Dudovich, Mele Napoli, 1907

Marcello Dudovich, Mele Napoli, 1907

5. Alphonse Mucha, Champagne Ruinart

Posters 19th century Alphonse Mucha, Ruinart champagne, 1896

Alphonse Mucha, Ruinart champagne, 1896

6. Alphonse Mucha, Biscuits Champagne

Posters 19th century Alfons Mucha, Biscuits Champagne Lefèvre Utile, 1896

Alfons Mucha, Biscuits Champagne Lefèvre Utile, 1896

7. Alphonse Mucha, Heidsieck Champagne

Posters 19th century Alphonse Mucha, Heidsieck Champagne

Alphonse Mucha, Heidsieck Champagne

8. Pierre Bonnard, France Champagne

Posters 19th century Pierre Bonnard, France Champagne, 1891

Pierre Bonnard, France Champagne, 1891

9. Jules Cheret, Eldorado Music HallPosters 19th century Jules Cheret Eldorado Music Hall, V&A

10. Jules Cheret, Carnival at the Theatre de l’Opera

Posters 19th centuryJules Cheret, Carnival at the Theatre de l'Opera, 1892

Jules Cheret, Carnival at the Theatre de l’Opera, 1892

Art Historian, founder and CEO of DailyArtMagazine.com and DailyArt mobile app. But to be honest, her greatest accomplishment is being the owner of Pimpek the Cat.

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