Connect with us

DailyArtMagazine.com – Art History Stories

Julie Manet – the Beauty of Impressionism

Artists' Stories

Julie Manet – the Beauty of Impressionism

 

Julie Manet with cat, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, 1887, Musée d'Orsay, Paris, Julie Manet - The Beauty of Impressionism

Julie Manet with cat, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, 1887, Musée d’Orsay, Paris

Julie Manet – the Beauty of Impressionism – was the daughter of the wealthy, well-connected painter Berthe Morisot and Eugène Manet, the brother of the famous impressionist painter Édouard Manet. The muse’s mother was highly valued as a painter in the art world of her times, and her early work was displayed for many years by the Salon de Paris. Gustave Geoffrey later wrote of her that: no one represents Impressionism with more refined talent or more authority than Morisot.


The beautiful Julie Manet was painted from the first moments she came into the world by her mother, who adored painting children. Both Morisot and her brother-in-law Édouard Manet continued portraying Julie throughout her childhood and early years as a teenager.

Julie had a beautiful upbringing, surrounded by great artists. Even after the untimely death of her parents when she became an orphan at the age of 16, she did not step out of the scene and continued posing for the great Pierre-Auguste Renoir, amongst others.

Julie began writing her memoirs when she was 10 years old, and they were published in 1987 under the title Growing Up with the Impressionists: The Diary of Julie Manet. Her work reveals fascinating stories about her family, as well as about other prominent artists including Alfred Sisley, Edgar Degas and Claude Monet.

One of the first paintings of the little muse was released in 1880, only 2 years after she was born. Berthe Morisot presents her little daughter on a lap of a nurse.

Julie Manet and Her Nurse, Berthe Morisot, 1880, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, Denmark, Julie Manet - The Beauty of Impressionism

Julie Manet and Her Nurse, Berthe Morisot, 1880, Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen, Denmark


 

Julie Manet and her Greyhound Laerte, Berthe Morisot, 1893, Musée Marmottan Monet, Paris, Julie Manet - the Beauty of Impressionism

Julie Manet and her Greyhound Laerte, Berthe Morisot, 1893, Musée Marmottan Monet, Paris

Here Renoir shows her in a subtle way and with a melancholic look. The second painting down below is a portrait of Julie and her mother, Berthe Morisot.

Portret de Julie Manet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, 1894, Musée Marmottan Monet, Julie Manet – the Beauty of Impressionism

Portret de Julie Manet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, 1894, Musée Marmottan Monet

Berthe Morisot and Her Daughter Julie Manet, 1894, Private Collection, Julie Manet – the Beauty of Impressionism

Berthe Morisot and Her Daughter Julie Manet, 1894, Private Collection

Berthe Morisot, Julie Daydreaming, 1894 Julie Manet – the Beauty of Impressionism

Berthe Morisot, Julie Daydreaming, 1894, private collection

 

Find out more:


is a fifth-year student towards her Master of Journalism degree, yet art has always been one of her biggest interests. She especially admires Impressionism, Postimpressionism as well as Realism. As a result, she can never get enough of museums, and therefore loves to travel the world.

Comments

More in Artists' Stories

  • 20th century

    Passing Time with Klee: Demonstrating Temporality in Visual Art

    By

    Paul Klee was a “musical” painter, not least because he chose the violin and bow before brush and easel. Klee’s father was a music teacher and his mother a singer, which had a profound effect on his approach to painting.  Fugue in Red (1921) is one...

  • 20th century

    The Dystopian Surrealism of Zdzislaw Beksinski

    By

    There are many fans of gruesome and gore art who are attracted to the dystopian surrealism of Zdzisław Beksiński. After all, he created such a gothic, haunting and stressful ambience in his paintings, making it hard to look away. He was a pioneer of Polish contemporary...

  • Artists' Stories

    Getting Your Teeth into Goya

    By

    Goya was not a happy man when he painted Saturn Devouring His Son, some time between 1819 and 1823. By the time he created this painting, illness had made him deaf and his wife was dying, enough for any man to overcome. Goya also lived through the invasion...

  • Architecture

    The Last Craftsman. Exploring Henry van de Velde and the Passage of Modernism

    By

    Until 1972, the Museen zu Berlin exhibited, among other things, a teapot and its accompanying set. From above, the teapot is around 22 centimetres long, 13,5 centimetres wide, and 13 centimetres tall. Its chrome finish gives an oil-surface ripple to the reflections of objects around it,...

  • Artists' Stories

    The Poetry in Painting — Turner’s Ovid in Exile

    By

    This petite (9.46 x 12.50 cm) oil on canvas by J.M.W. Turner contains big things: big landscapes, big stories and big skies. It is an imagined scene from 1st century Rome: the departure of Ovid into his famous exile. All Roads Lead to Rome… Joseph Mallord...

To Top

Just to let you know, DailyArt Magazine’s website uses cookies to personalise content and adverts, to provide social media features and to analyse traffic. Read cookies policy