Connect with us

DailyArtMagazine.com – Art History Stories

What Is a Tronie? Famous Examples of Tronies in Dutch and Flemish Baroque

Art History 101

What Is a Tronie? Famous Examples of Tronies in Dutch and Flemish Baroque

The Dutch and Flemish Baroque of the 17th century is mostly known through the works of Rembrandt in the Dutch Republic and Rubens in Flanders. However, during this period, genre painting, the painting of everyday life, flourished as well. An especially interesting category is the tronie.

What is a tronie?

  • The term tronie means “face” in 17th century Dutch. It refers to a group of paintings that depicts an anonymous sitter, sometimes with an exaggerated expression or unusual and flamboyant costume.
  • Basically, they are character studies of an idealized version of a face or character that sparked the artists’ imagination.
  • The difference between a portrait and a tronie is that in a portrait the sitter is known and the art piece has been commissioned whereas tronies were sold in the art market.

Artists turned to the tronie for many reasons. For example, it presents a unique opportunity to experiment with facial expressions and lighting. The painter has an opportunity to enhance or display his/her skills through certain challenging aspects of the painting such as an extravagant facial expression.

Famous examples of tronies

Girl with a Pearl Earring

Johannes Vermeer,The Girl with a Pearl Earring, 1665, oil on canvas, 44.5 x 39 cm, Mauritshuis, The Hague, Netherlands. tronie
A famous tronie: Johannes Vermeer, The Girl with a Pearl Earring, 1665, Mauritshuis, The Hague, Netherlands.

Probably the most famous tronie is The Girl with a Pearl Earring by Johannes Vermeer (1632-1675). The painting depicts a Dutch girl dressed in oriental costume with a turban and an excessively big pearl earring.  She is sometimes referred to as ‘’The Mona Lisa of the North’’ due to the mysterious look in her eyes that makes her expression unrecognizable. The painting inspired a novel which, in turn, led to a movie and a play. Vermeer displays his mastery over light, seen in the softness of the girl’s features, the shine on the pearl and the flickering light on her parted lips. Here you can find more info on the painting.

Girl with the Red Hat

Johannes Vermeer, Girl with a Red Hat, 1665/166, oil on panel,40.3 x 35.6 cm, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.
A famous tronie: Johannes Vermeer, Girl with a Red Hat, 1665/166, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.

A girl wearing a lavish red hat leans against a chair and directly engages the viewer. It is an intimate piece and one of the smallest works by Vermeer. The sumptuous red of the girl’s hat along with the lush blue of her clothes are the most arresting features of the painting, emitting a sense of warmth. The light caresses her face and puts a shine on the pearl earrings she is wearing. The young woman’s lips are parted in an expectant expression.

‘Tronie’ of a Man with a Feathered Beret

Rembrandt, 'Tronie' of a Man with a Feathered Beret, 1635-40, oil on panel, 62.5 x 47 cm, Mauritshuis, The Hague, Netherlands. tronie
A famous tronie: Rembrandt, ‘Tronie’ of a Man with a Feathered Beret, 1635-40, Mauritshuis, The Hague, Netherlands.

A man turns his head and looks at the viewer with an annoyed or arrogant expression. Rembrandt imagined an eclectic, old fashioned costume for this character, a soldier as marked by the metal collar, called a gorget, on his neck. He is dressed in a grand black feathered beret with an ostrich feather, highlighted by the monochrome background, a cloak with gold embroidery and a gold earring. Each element of the costume is used to demonstrate the painter’s skillful technique. It seems that Rembrandt used his own features as a template for the character’s face as he bears a resemblance to the painter.

Bust of an Old Man with Turban

Rembrandt, Bust of an Old Man with Turban, 1627-28, oil on panel, 26.5 x 20 cm, The Kremer Collection, Amsterdam.
A famous tronie: Rembrandt, Bust of an Old Man with Turban, 1627-28, The Kremer Collection, Amsterdam.

This is one of Rembrandt’s earliest tronies. Essentially, it is a study in lighting, a way for the artist to experiment with lighting effects. Here the light comes from the background casting a strong shadow on half of the man’s face. The transition from light to shadow is subtle and masterfully executed. Strong contrasts shape the figure’s face as his lines and wrinkles catch the light; his nose and beard reflect light as well. The old man is wearing an ornate turban with sparkling gold embroidery while the red gem on the clasp brightens the shadow area.

Laughing Boy

Frans Hals, Laughing Boy, 1625, oil on panel, 30.45 cm, Mauritshuis, The Hague, Netherlands. tronie
A famous tronie: Frans Hals, Laughing Boy, 1625, Mauritshuis, The Hague, Netherlands.

A young boy bursts in a buoyant laugh. He has seen something outside the painting that has lifted his spirits. Frans Hals (1582-1666) has succeeded in the challenging task of capturing the boy’s impulsive expression, one that we seldom see in 17th-century Dutch painting. The artist painted the boy in his distinctive style of energetic but careful brushstrokes, adding to the cheerful atmosphere of the piece. Considering the spontaneity of the theme and the execution, it is no wonder that the Impressionists of the 19th century deemed Hals their forerunner.   

The Bitter Potion

Adriaen Brouwer, The Bitter Potion, 1636-38, oil on oak, 47.4 x 35.5 cm, Städel Museum, Frankfurt, Germany tronie
A famous tronie: Adriaen Brouwer, The Bitter Potion, 1636-38, Städel Museum, Frankfurt, Germany.

This man must have swallowed something extremely foul tasting. His features have deformed expressing utter disgust, an emotion so violent, the viewer almost feels it. His clothes and cap are simple and worn; he is probably a peasant. The artwork is dedicated to the sense of taste but with a twist. This is something very unusual as we rarely see paintings with people actually eating or drinking. Such aspects make the painting unique. The work is by Flemish painter Adriaen Brouwer (1606-1638). Brouwer loved to paint peasants and genre scenes usually set in taverns and instilling his subjects with intense emotions.

Youth Making a Face

Adriaen Brouwer, Youth Making a Face, 1632-35, oil on panel, 13.7 x 10.5 cm, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. tronie
A famous tronie: Adriaen Brouwer, Youth Making a Face, 1632-35, National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.

Yet another piece by Brouwer. A young man looks at the viewer and makes a mocking gesture. He is a peasant like the man in The Bitter Potion and is portrayed as unrefined and ill-mannered, a stereotype according to the city dwellers of the 17th century. The painter presents the coarse behavior of peasants as a cautionary tale about their moral failings to instruct urban populations about proper behavior. However, he has managed to capture a very real and very shocking, if somewhat comic, expression. The painting style of small, dynamic brushstrokes reminds us of Frans Hals.


Tronies are a truly fascinating group of paintings. Through them we perceive the creative spirit and imagination of the artists who conceived them. It is remarkable that even though tronies depict unidentified sitters, through the immediacy of their expression we feel like we know them.


See also Rembrandt Self-Portrait With Curly Hair!

Art Historian, she graduated from the Department of History and Archeology of the University of Athens and has a Masters degree in Art History from the University of Sussex. She is a member of the Association of Greek Art Historians.

She has worked in the National Gallery of Art in Athens and in the 4th Athens Biennale AGORA (2013). She has taught Art History in the Municipal Art School of Aghia Paraskevi and in the digital university Iversity (Berlin). She was the assistant curator of the exhibition Inferno of George Pol. Ioannidis in the Italian Institute of Culture in Athens (2017-2018), where she presented the painter’s work in a lecture at the Institute. Her articles have been published in Ta Nea tis Technis and avopolis.gr. Recently, one of her short stories was among the winners in the 2nd short story competition of Ianos bookstore and was published.

Comments

More in Art History 101

  • Ferrante Imperato, Room of curiosities. Source: www.wunderkammer.at Ferrante Imperato, Room of curiosities. Source: www.wunderkammer.at

    Animals

    What is a Wunderkammer? Best Cabinets of Curiosities

    By

    The characteristic of arousing surprise for the observer is typical for the so-called Wunderkammer or Cabinet of Curiosities. These are real rooms of wonders where, in an undifferentiated mix of art and science, of naturalia and artificialia, the most unusual finds are associated with all sorts...

  • 20th century

    Max Ernst and Birds: A Relationship Explained Through Paintings

    By

    Max Ernst (1891–1976) was a prolific German avant-garde artist. He was a pioneer in the early 20th century movements of Dada and Surrealism and developed a number of inventive artistic techniques. Ernst had the ability to make the unbelievable believable through his art. For this reason,...

  • Art History 101

    Everything You Need to Know About François Boucher

    By

    François Boucher (1703-1770) was a French artist well known for his Rococo style artworks. His artworks are synonymous with the blossom of color and sensuality because Boucher was able to depict nude bodies, giving them a delicate and dreamy look. Also, his masterful use of colors expressed...

  • Art History 101

    Art History 101: Twelve Portraits You Should Know

    By

    Let us embark on a journey through the course of art history with twelve significant portraits everybody should definitely know! The human need to capture its likeness comes with the birth of civilization, making portraiture one of the oldest art forms. We can find the origins...

  • 19th Century

    10 Things You Should Know About the Pre-Raphaelites

    By

    Just about all of us have a tiny inkling about Impressionism, the Renaissance, maybe even Expressionism and what makes each movement different from the other. However, when it comes to the Pre-Raphaelites most people, including myself, would have no clue what you are talking about. But...

To Top

Just to let you know, DailyArt Magazine’s website uses cookies to personalise content and adverts, to provide social media features and to analyse traffic. Read cookies policy