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Click Here If You’re On A Diet And Craving Something Sweet

Wayne Thiebaud, Cakes, 1963, National Gallery of Art

Food

Click Here If You’re On A Diet And Craving Something Sweet

I’ve decided – I’m going on a diet. Another one. And this time I’m going to stick to it, honestly!
In order to survive, because I have a terrible sweet tooth, I’ve prepared something I can hold on to when I feel I need a sweet snack. Or two.
If you’re in a similar situation, have a look on this page. Hopefully, it won’t make you crave sweets even more…

Ice- cream dessert

Andy Warhol, Untitled (Ice Cream Dessert), 1959

Andy Warhol, Untitled (Ice Cream Dessert), 1959, Estate of Andy Warhol and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Andy Warhol had a sweet tooth, too. He admitted once: “all I ever really want is sugar”. He had his favorite Serendipity 3 café where he held parties and meetings, and this colourful dessert most probably comes from there. You can find it at 225 East 60th Street, between Second and Third avenues in New York City.

Doughnuts

Tjalf Sparnaay, Donuts, 2015, painter's property

Tjalf Sparnaay, Donuts, 2015, painter’s property

Oh, these doughnuts are so tempting… Who could possibly resist this Megarealistic painting? And to make the situation worse, Sparnaay, a contemporary Dutch painter, specializes in the Hyperrealistic depictions of food. If you ever feel hungry, look up his paintings of burgers, fried eggs or profiteroles… It’s a shame they’re not edible.

A small reproduction of a very short moment of weakness

Godfried Schalcken Young Girl Eating Sweets, 1680–8

Godfried Schalcken, Young Girl Eating Sweets, 1680–8, Eijk and Rose-Marie van Otterloo Collection

Having seen those doughnuts I need a short break…
(This painting is so consoling, I feel comforted to see that snacking on sweets in secret is a centuries-old problem.)

Cakes

Wayne Thiebaud, Cakes, 1963, National Gallery of Art

Wayne Thiebaud, Cakes, 1963, National Gallery of Art

Wayne Thiebaud is an American painter most famous for depictions of ordinary objects who in the early 1960s centered his painting around food. This choice of popular products as subjects for painting and use of bright colours brought him to be associated with Pop Art.
Some interpreted his works as expressing critique of American consumerism but Thiebaud claimed that they were born out of his nostalgia for old times rather than contempt.

A table full of desserts

Jan Davidsz. de Heem , A Table of Desserts, 1640, Louvre Museum

Jan Davidsz. de Heem , A Table of Desserts, 1640, Louvre Museum

To polish off I’m giving you a real feast. You can find here all kinds of fruit, alcohol, a pie and even some bread. Jan Davidsz. de Heem knew how to party. He was one of the most famous Flemish and Dutch (he lived both in Utrecht and Antwerp) still-life painters, and his specialization was ‘pronkstillevens’, that is very sumptuous still lifes.
The only thing missing in the painting is a person to eat it all and then play the lute.

Magda, art historian and Italianist, she writes about art because she cannot make it herself. She loves committed and political artists like Ai Weiwei or the Futurists; like Joseph Beuys she believes that art can change us and we can change the world.

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