Connect with us

DailyArtMagazine.com – Art History Stories

Art Guide to Quarantine by DailyArt

Pablo Picasso, Interior with a Girl Drawing, 1935, Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Art State of Mind

Art Guide to Quarantine by DailyArt

So, you’re bored in quarantine, or maybe they closed your favorite museum. The COVID-19 outbreak has us all wondering what to do. If just like us you turn to art in anxious times, you might use this guideline to fill your time with a bit of beauty.

10 Art-History things you can do without leaving your house!

So, you’re bored in quarantine, or maybe they closed your favorite museum. The COVID-19 outbreak has us all wondering what to do. If, like us, you turn to art history in anxious times, you can use this Art Guide to Quarantine to fill your time with a bit of beauty.

DailyArt’s Art Guide to Quarantine

1. Start your day right with the DailyArt app

It’s basically a small museum in your pocket. This simple app showcases a different artwork each day, and might very soon become your favorite morning notification. Available for Android and iPhone, DailyArt has educational descriptions written by art-historians translated into 13 languages.

Pro tip? Use the “Archive” and “Favourite” option to create your own, personal art gallery.

Screenshot from the DailyArt app on tablet, biography of Vincent van Gogh with description and portrait
Screenshot from the DailyArt app, www.getdailyart.com.

2. Subscribe to the DailyArt Magazine


Yours and faithful! There’s so much to read. Discover our Painting of the Week, Women Artists archive… or get lost in WTF Art History (there are cats!).

painting by Pauline Roche, Sidestep at the Portraits; Art Guide to Quarantine
Pauline Roche, Sidestep at the Portraits, 2014, source: https://paulinerochefineart.com/.

3. Have a walk around MET or visit Taj Mahal… virtually

If you miss visiting a particular place you can use Google’s Streetview option to walk through the halls of your favorite museum. Or you can go to the Taj Mahal. Or Pompeii. The Rijksmuseum? The options are endless and you’ll also even find archives of already closed exhibitions. No queues, no tall people hovering in front of paintings. We could get used to this. 
The recently closed MET Museum has a very similar program, with six immersive videos in the 360° technique
If you have virtual reality equipment you can go for a short trip to Versailles.

painting by Pablo Picasso, Interior with a Girl drawing ; Art Guide to Quarantine
Pablo Picasso, Interior with a Girl Drawing, 1935, Museum of Modern Art, New York.

4. Find your new favorite artworks in an online gallery


Aside from the already mentioned DailyArt App and the Google Arts & Culture project, you can find and curate your favorite pieces in: 

  • Europeana — an amazing source for all European cultural heritage. It might be a useful link to pin for graphics and social media managers as it has a special catalog of Free Re-use images. 
  • Curiator is a collaborative project based on user-contributed art, so it might be a great place to find out about lesser-known names. 
  • And finally, for those crazy about medieval manuscripts, you’ll find a huge digitized collection on DMMapp by Sexy Codicology. 
Picture from the Asmole Bestiary, Manuscript with cats
Ashmole Bestiary, 1511, Oxford Bodleian Library MS., source DMAPP SexyCodicology.

5. Experiment with Art

Shadow art, collage, poem-portraits… Co-created by artists and coders, Google Arts & Culture experiments will be a never-ending source of fun. 
Check out Google Arts Experiments.

Art Guide to Quarantine
Google Art Palette, search by color, source: Arts Experiments with Google.

6. Listen to podcasts


If you live with your headphones on, you might enjoy some of the more popular art podcasts.

The Art History Babes are basically friends that sip wine and discuss culture, and isn’t that what we all need sometimes? You can find them on Spotify or on their website
If you’re into unique finds, you’ll love ArtCurious and Jennifer Dasal’s commentary on juicy stories in art history. 

Ishibashi Kazonuri, Lady reading poetry, 1906, Shimane Art Museum, source: Shimane Art Museum Collection Online.

7. Study Art History


I especially like Smarthistory’s youtube videos – like this one about Elisabeth Vigee le Brun: (if you like this artist, you might want to check our painting of the week!). Smarthistory works in cooperation with Khan Academy, and is currently one of the best online courses available.

The Stadel Course of Modern Art is more of an appreciation course, where you’ll learn how to look at over 200 modern masterworks. It’s free of charge and based on easy, interactive modules. 

8. Become a critic of AI-art


It’s said to be the newest big genre in art. 9gans is an online art gallery consisting of pieces generated by Artificial Intelligence. It refreshes every hour, which means that every image is unique and most likely won’t appear again. 

Art Guide to Quarantine
AI-generated image, source: 9gans.

9. Check out some good news-art channels

Some of my personal favorites are be:

  • Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings. I honestly couldn’t describe this website better than the writer did herself — “(…) search for meaning across literature, science, art, philosophy, and the various other tentacles of human thought and feeling.” 
  • Hyperallergic, one of the best sources for contemporary art content. Podcast, reviews, they have it all. 
  • And again, don’t forget about DailyArt Magazine 🙂 

For quick tidbits and lots of visual inspiration, you won’t find a better place than Instagram and Twitter.

10. And if all else fails… Create!

You don’t need a professional canvas to be an artist. Listen to these words of advice by Ralph Waldo Emerson — “Every artist was first an amateur” — and start creating! Find your feelings and your style, and who knows, we might feature you one day.

If you enjoyed reading DailyArt’s Art Guide to Quarantine, here’s a full list of our “Lockdown” home entertainment articles. Stay safe and #Stayhome!

7 Entertaining Art History Podcasts to Listen to

10 Best Movies Related to Art for Time Spent in Quarantine

The Best Art Videos for the Age of Quarantine

The Best of the Best Museums to Visit Virtually on Lockdown (Constantly Updated)

Lockdown Artsy Entertainment Toolkit

Virtual Art Repositories – Explore Endless Artworks from Quarantine

Theatre Plays, Opera and Music Online to Keep you Entertained During Lockdown

15 Artsy Books To Read During Self-Quarantine

What to Do with Your Time when in Quarantine? Tips from Art!

Art-Guide to Quarantine by DailyArt Magazine

Art historian and pop culture geek. Spends days reposting pictures of art and fluffy kittens. My favourite drink is a mimosa, cause you gotta take your vitamins somehow?
Polish, currently based in Tel Aviv.

Comments

More in Art State of Mind

  • Animals

    The Lady with the Dog

    By

    The Lady with the Dog is a title that I borrowed from Chekhov’s short story. It is a story of an affair, however, in art the dog quite often has been a symbol of fidelity. As you will also see below, dogs also have been symbols...

  • 19th Century

    Around the World With a Painter: Frederic Edwin Church’s Travels

    By

    Hudson River School painter Frederic Edwin Church (1826-1900) was a true world traveler. In his lifetime, Church visited the Arctic, Mexico, South America, the Caribbean, Europe, and the Middle East. He painted gorgeous landscape scenes based on each location. Let’s journey around the world as we...

  • Alan Harris Countryside Alan Harris Countryside

    Art State of Mind

    The British Landscape in Art

    By

    The British Landscape: where do we start? From Turner to Hogan the British landscape presents a constant challenge to artists to capture its elusive moods. Landscape painting is deeply soulful, often telling stories of homeliness and comfort. At the same time it can be filled with...

  • Art State of Mind

    10 Ways to Spend the Summer, Inspired by Art

    By

    Art suggests and indicates many things to a perceptive viewer. We believe it can also be the perfect ‘influencer’ when it comes to current trends, lifestyles, and activities. The many changes we have had to face since the arrival of COVID-19 might feel daunting at times...

  • Art State of Mind

    Seven Books About Art for Holiday Chill

    By

    Holiday time but not sure if you can afford to travel? Or do you just need something to help forget about social distancing while relaxing somewhere and not being at work? Whatever you are looking for, a good book is what you might need. Of course...

To Top

Just to let you know, DailyArt Magazine’s website uses cookies to personalise content and adverts, to provide social media features and to analyse traffic. Read cookies policy