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This Victorian Film Will Make You Feel Like On Florence And The Machine Concert

Music

This Victorian Film Will Make You Feel Like On Florence And The Machine Concert

This month I saw a concert of Florence and the Machine. Of course it was awesome. The band played one of it’s classics – Rabbit Heart (Raise It Up). It looked like this:

It reminded me of this dancer from 1898:

This woman performs a dance inspired by George du Maurier’s character Trilby, in an early modern dance style reminiscent of Isadora Duncan. She dances barefoot without stockings and is dressed in a long, flowing gown bound across the bosom in Grecian style, with inside fringe and a draped cape hooked to her wrist. She also wears what appears to be a garland headpiece. Holding her gown with one hand throughout, the dancer performs a series of kicks and turns with leg kicks front and back, rocking, and round de jambe. Well, times may change but the way that people dance don’t  🙂

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Art Historian, huge fan of Giorgione and Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres. Founder and CEO of DailyArtMagazine.com and DailyArt mobile app. But to be honest, her greatest accomplishment is being the owner of Pimpek the Cat.

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