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This Victorian Film Will Make You Feel Like On Florence And The Machine Concert

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This Victorian Film Will Make You Feel Like On Florence And The Machine Concert

This month I saw a concert of Florence and the Machine. Of course it was awesome. The band played one of it’s classics – Rabbit Heart (Raise It Up). It looked like this:

It reminded me of this dancer from 1898:

This woman performs a dance inspired by George du Maurier’s character Trilby, in an early modern dance style reminiscent of Isadora Duncan. She dances barefoot without stockings and is dressed in a long, flowing gown bound across the bosom in Grecian style, with inside fringe and a draped cape hooked to her wrist. She also wears what appears to be a garland headpiece. Holding her gown with one hand throughout, the dancer performs a series of kicks and turns with leg kicks front and back, rocking, and round de jambe. Well, times may change but the way that people dance don’t  🙂

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Art Historian, founder and CEO of DailyArtMagazine.com and DailyArt mobile app. But to be honest, her greatest accomplishment is being the owner of Pimpek the Cat.

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