Connect with us

DailyArtMagazine.com – Art History Stories

Natural Shine – Nature Inspired Jewelry from Victoria and Albert Museum

Tiara, England, ca 1850, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London - jewelry
Tiara, England, ca 1850, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

Fashion

Natural Shine – Nature Inspired Jewelry from Victoria and Albert Museum

The Victoria and Albert Museum in London has a fantastic collection of jewelry. This time we will take a look at the pieces inspired by natural forms. Nature-inspired jewelry, decorated with clearly recognizable flowers or fruit, emerged with the Romantic movement in the early 19th century. It remained popular for many decades.

This fashion started in the early years of the century, with the widespread interest in botany and the influence of Romantic poets such as Wordsworth. By the 1850s the delicate early designs had given way to more extravagant and complex compositions of flowers and foliage. The flowers and foliage consisted of diamonds, pearls, and enamel.

The Victoria and Albert jewelry collection includes a gold Celtic breastplate, jeweled pendants given by Elizabeth I to her courtiers. As well as, diamonds worn by Catherine the Great of Russia, jewelry by the art-nouveau designer, Réné Lalique, diamond tiaras by Cartier, and contemporary works by Wendy Ramshaw, Peter Chang, and Marjorie Schick.

Spray ornament, maker unknown, ca 1850, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London - gold, diamonds
Spray ornament, maker unknown, ca 1850, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

This large spray of assorted flowers has a pin fastening at the back and women would wear it as a bodice ornament. In addition to its size and number of diamonds, the diamond flowers are set on springs, increasing their sparkle considerably as the wearer moved. Over time the floral motifs became bigger, and by the 1850s bouquets had taken on dramatic proportions.

Personally, I would have two slight problems with this fantastic piece. For one it has the potential of causing accidents, imagine wearing it on the street in the sun, it would give a blinding sparkle! The other issue is more fundamental and I have it with all the pieces shown here: they are so beautiful that instead of wearing them I would sit and look at them.

Diamond Wreath

Tiara, England, ca 1850, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London - jewelryNature Inspired Jewelry
Tiara, England, ca 1850, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

Wreaths of flowers and foliage were in fashion throughout the 19th century. Sometimes they included real flowers or artificial ones made of fabric, wax or porcelain. At the same time, people often expressed loved and friendship through flowers. Because gemstones matched the natural flower colors, a ‘language of flowers’ spelled out special messages.

In contrast with earlier periods, the more elaborate jewelry was worn almost exclusively by women. Now it seems obvious, but imagine what a sad change that must have been! To have to stop wearing all those dazzling pieces!

Rainbow Enameled Bouquet

Spray ornament, 1790-1800, Spain, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Spray ornament, 1790-1800, Spain, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

A lady would wear this magnificent jeweled bouquet as a bodice ornament, attached with a removable metal hook. We know that a Spanish noblewoman, Doña Juana Rabasa (wife of the Finance Minister of Charles IV of Spain) was its the original owner. She gave it to the shrine of the Virgin of the Pillar at Saragossa.

Spiky Leaf

Nature Inspired Jewelry
Brooch, ca 1895, René Jules Lalique (designer), Tiffany & Co. (maker), Paris, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

René Lalique was Art Nouveau’s most important jeweler. He developed a new stylistic language based on sinuous interpretations of natural forms and championed non-precious materials such as enamel, glass, and horn. The resulting pieces were both dramatic and ethereal, and very influential among other jewelers who went on to work in the Art Nouveau style.


Made in about 1895, this brooch shows Lalique’s developing interest in stylized motifs from nature. Generally, he tended to distance himself from conventional precious stones. However, it was designed for Tiffany & Co. and perhaps as a result is realized in conventional diamonds.

The diamonds may be conventional, but there are no stones that beat them when it comes to a good sparkle. I think that in comparison with the other pieces, this one is almost casual, and every-day thing to be worn to the office.

Glorious Orchid

Nature Inspired Jewelry
Hair ornament, 1905-7, Philippe Wolfers, Belgium, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Philippe Wolfers was one of the most prestigious of the Art Nouveau jewelers working in Belgium. Like for his Parisian contemporary René Lalique, the natural world was his great inspiration. The exotic orchids feature in the work of both, their fluid lines rendering themselves beautifully to Art Nouveau style. The technical achievement of enameling in plique-a-jour (backless) enamel on these gently rolling surfaces is impressive. 

Have you ever visited The Victoria and Albert Museum jewelry collection? What are your favorite pieces? Would you wear nature inspired jewelry?

Alphonse Mucha, Art Nouveau master

Disruptive Because Pretty: Art Guide To Aestheticism

Art historian by education, data geek by trade, art and book lover by passion, based in London in love with Europe and travelling around it. You can visit my book blog here: https://bookskeptic.com/

Comments

More in Fashion

  • 19th Century

    Artists and Industrial Revolution: Images of the Changing World

    By

    The Industrial Revolution brought fundamental and irreversible social changes. But what was its influence on art and artists? Changing Times, Changing Themes Even though depictions of rural labor remained frequent, industry, as an important part of the reality and people’s life, became a more and more...

  • 20th century

    Passing Time with Klee: Demonstrating Temporality in Visual Art

    By

    Paul Klee was a “musical” painter, not least because he chose the violin and bow before brush and easel. Klee’s father was a music teacher and his mother a singer, which had a profound effect on his approach to painting.  Fugue in Red (1921) is one...

  • 20th century

    Tina Modotti. A Woman of Her Time

    By

    Tina Modotti is a photographer whose path parallels the great moments of 20th-century history. Her way of making art is a testimony to the world around her and her eye on it. Emigration to the States Tina Modotti was born in 1896 in Italy to a...

  • 20th century

    Make Everywhere Our New York: Keith Haring Exhibition to Inspire Liverpool Millennials

    By

    Why do Keith Haring’s works still matter in 2019? With Brexit approaching the deadline, Tate Liverpool welcomes the first major exhibition in the UK of Keith Haring. Here are some highlights at the exhibition that Liverpool millennials think are inspirational at this critical transitional point. Go...

  • 20th century

    The Largest Mural on Earth

    By

    Early Fall, for students around the world, means one thing: back to school, back to writing papers, and exam preparations. For students of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), it means back to Ciudad Universitaria, the beautiful complex of modernist buildings, planned by a group...

To Top

Just to let you know, DailyArt Magazine’s website uses cookies to personalise content and adverts, to provide social media features and to analyse traffic. Read cookies policy