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Carnivalesque Man Ray and His Masks

Man Ray, Noire et blanche (Black and white), 1926, Black and white photographic print. © Man Ray Trust / ADAGP - PICTORIGHT / Telimage - 2013
Man Ray, Kiki de Montparnasse in Noire et blanche (Black and white), 1926, Black and white photographic print. © Man Ray Trust / ADAGP - PICTORIGHT / Telimage - 2013

Photography

Carnivalesque Man Ray and His Masks

Since the carnival is officially on, I thought of writing an article about masks. The first artist that comes to mind if one says ‘masks’ is James Ensor, so if you feel like reading about eerie atmosphere and skeletons, click here. Yet if you want to find out about another artist who often featured masks in his work, stay with me, Man Ray, and his masks.

In the lens of others

Yousuf Karsh, Man Ray, 1965. Source: https://karsh.org/photographs, man ray and his masks

Yousuf Karsh, Man Ray, 1965. Source: https://karsh.org/photographs

Yousuf Karsh CC (1908 -2002), was a photographer who as a teenager fled Armenian Genocide with his family and reached Canada with the status of refugee. By the 1930s he established himself as a photographer in Ottawa and quickly became known for his portraits. Throughout his 60-year long career, he photographed the most notable personalities of his era, often featuring on the cover of Life magazine. He has been described as one of the greatest portrait photographers of the 20th century, no surprise Man Ray agreed to sit for him.

Others in his lens

Man Ray, Kiki de Montparnasse in Man Ray, Noire et blanche (Black and white), 1926, Black and white photographic print. © Man Ray Trust / ADAGP - PICTORIGHT / Telimage - 2013, man ray and his masks

Man Ray, Kiki de Montparnasse in Noire et blanche (Black and white), 1926, Black and white photographic print. © Man Ray Trust / ADAGP – PICTORIGHT / Telimage – 2013

Man Ray was born as Emmanuel Radnitzky, the eldest child of Russian Jewish immigrants in Pennsylvania. Due to frequent antisemitic reactions and discrimination, around 1912 the Radnitzky family changed their surname to Ray, chosen by one of the artist’s brothers, while Emmanuel, who was called “Manny” as a nickname, changed his first name to Man.

Man Ray, Noire et Blanche (variante), 1926, © Man Ray Trust / ADAGP - PICTORIGHT / Telimage - 2013, man ray and his masks

Man Ray, Noire et Blanche (variante), 1926, © Man Ray Trust / ADAGP – PICTORIGHT / Telimage – 2013


André Breton once described him as a ‘pre-Surrealist’. Although he held a natural affinity for the style and his work as early as 1920 had Surrealist undertones, his ties with the movement were rather informal. He was strongly influenced by Dada and Marcel Duchamp, who also often featured in his photography.

Man Ray, André Breton, 1930. Source: wikiart, man ray and his masks

Man Ray, André Breton, 1930. Source: Wikiart

Although American, he spent most of his career in France, painting and making photography, which for him often operated in the gap between art and life. Apart from photography for its own sake (inventing his own technique of making photograms, which he called “rayographs”), he also created loads of commercial photos for film and fashion industries, as you can see below.

Man Ray, Elizabeth Arden Electrotherapy Facial Mask, 1932. Source: ArtStack, man ray and his masks

Man Ray, Elizabeth Arden Electrotherapy Facial Mask, 1932. Source: ArtStack

Man Ray, The Duchess of Windsor (then Mrs. Ernest Simpson), 1936; Source: Allure, man ray and his masks

Man Ray, The Duchess of Windsor (then Mrs. Ernest Simpson), 1936; Source: Allure

In his own lens

Man Ray, The Lifemask, 1932, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, © Man Ray Trust / ARS/ ADAGP, man ray and his masks

Man Ray, The Lifemask, 1932, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, © Man Ray Trust / ARS/ ADAGP


Thanks to a descendant of Man Ray, the long unknown identity of the sculptor depicted in this photo was revealed in 2013. Paul Hamann (1891-1973) enjoyed brief celebrity during the 1930s when he developed a substance for creating life-masks. Apparently, the lotion was so pleasant to the sitter that Elizabeth Arden even asked him for the formula. Sadly, Hamann had to flee Germany because his activity was denounced by the Nazis as degenerate. Subsequently, he was interned on the Isle of Man alongside many refugee musicians and artists.

Man Ray, The Lifemask, 1932, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, © Man Ray Trust / ARS/ ADAGP, man ray and his masks

Man Ray, The Lifemask, 1932, The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, © Man Ray Trust / ARS/ ADAGP

According to a catalogue by the Warren Gallery announcing an exhibition of Hamann’s Mask Portraits in June 1930, Paul Hamann’s substance “looks like tomato soup and smells faintly of vanilla. … It is the gentlest, kindliest, most coaxing process imaginable. .. And the result, as you observe, is magnificent…. All this will be achieved by you and Herr Hamann if you consent to sit patiently in a chair for forty minutes.”


If you want to learn more about his comprehensive activity, read Learn More About Man Ray’s Cadeau to find out about his Dada objects, or read Man Ray, Kiki With African Mask to find out about his relationship with Kiki de Montparnasse.

   

Magda, art historian and Italianist, she writes about art because she cannot make it herself. She loves committed and political artists like Ai Weiwei or the Futurists; like Joseph Beuys she believes that art can change us and we can change the world.

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