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10 Things That Could Happen To You Only If You Were A Greek God/Goddess

Ancient Greece

10 Things That Could Happen To You Only If You Were A Greek God/Goddess

If you ever feel down and think that your life is just a series of misfortunes, have a look on this list. It’s not all roses to be a Greek god…

1. Prometheus

Frans Snyders and Peter Paul Rubens, Prometheus Bound, 1618


You would be punished for your disobedience to have your liver ripped out by an eagle repeatedly every day.

2. Atlas

Farnese Atlas, Naples

Farnese Atlas, Naples

You could be sentenced to carrying the world on your shoulders like Atlas.

3. Zeus

Jean Dominique Ingres, Zeus and Tetis, 1811

Jean Dominique Ingres, Zeus and Tetis, 1811


You would rule over the skies, other gods and the people like the most powerful god Zeus/Jupiter.

4. Daphne

Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Daphne and Apollo. 1625

Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Daphne and Apollo. 1625

Would turn you into a laurel tree if he didn’t like your prospective boyfriend.

5. Medusa

Caravaggio, Medusa, 1597, Galleria Uffizi, Florence

Caravaggio, Medusa, 1597, Galleria Uffizi, Florence


You could turn other people into stones like Medusa.

6. Saturn’s children

Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, Saturn Devouring One Of His Sons, 1821-1823

You could be eaten by your own father. Or could eat your own children- depends who you are in the hierarchy.

7. Leda

Leonardo da Vinci, Leda and the Swan, 1510

Leonardo da Vinci, Leda and the Swan, 1510


You could befriend a swan like Leda (but the swan would turn out to be Jupiter in disguise).

8. Mars+Venus vs Vulcan

Joachim Anthonisz Wtewael, Mars and Venus Surprised by Vulcan, 1604 - 1608


You would be able to pin down your cheating wife with an iron net as Vulcan did to Venus.

8. Venus

 venus.

W. A. Bouguereau, The Birth of Venus, 1879

You’d be born out of sea foam like Venus.

9. Danae

Danae

Gustav Klimt, Danae, 1907, Vienna

You could become impregnated by a rain of gold and give birth to Jupiter’s son.

10. Narcissus

Caravaggio, Narcissus, 1596

Caravaggio, Narcissus, 1596

You could fall in love with your own reflection like Narcissus and be turned into a flower.

Find out more about Greek myths:

     

 

 

 

 

Magda, art historian and Italianist, she writes about art because she cannot make it herself. She loves committed and political artists like Ai Weiwei or the Futurists; like Joseph Beuys she believes that art can change us and we can change the world.

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