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Karl Bodmer and His Native American Portraits

Karl Bodmer, Hotokaneheh, Piegan Blackfoot Man, 1833, watercolor and graphite on paper, gift of the Enron Art Foundation, 1986, Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, NE, USA. Detail.

Museums And Exhibitions

Karl Bodmer and His Native American Portraits

The Karl Bodmer: North American Portraits exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City spotlights compelling 19th-century watercolors of Native Americans.

Karl Bodmer and Prince Maxmillian

In 1833, Swiss artist Karl Bodmer (1809-1893) traveled to the United States. Along with the German explorer Maximilian, Prince of Wied-Neuwied (1782-1867), Bodmer spent a year among Native American communities along the Missouri River. Prince Max wanted to study Great Plains cultures, such as the Omaha, Mandan, and Blackfeet. Therefore, he hired Bodmer to document his voyage. Prints based on Bodmer’s numerous sketches and watercolors later populated Prince Max’s extensive publication about his journey.

Of these images, Bodmer’s portraits of the Native Americans he met in the mid-west are by far the most interesting. Karl Bodmer: North American Portraits includes 35 of these watercolor portraits, along with selected other works. All are on loan from the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, NE, which owns the full archive of Bodmer’s illustrations and Prince Max’s journals.

Karl Bodmer, Chan-Chä-Uiá-Te-Üinn, Lakota Sioux Woman, 1833, watercolor and graphite on paper, gift of the Enron Art Foundation, 1986, Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, NE, USA.
Karl Bodmer, Chan-Chä-Uiá-Te-Üinn, Lakota Sioux Woman, 1833, watercolor and graphite on paper, gift of the Enron Art Foundation, 1986, Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, NE, USA.

The Native American Portraits

Karl Bodmer: North American Portraits is a small show. Appreciating these highly-detailed works requires time and attention, though, so there’s still a lot to take in and think about.

Personally, I found the portraits to be sensitive and fascinating. Bodmer presented sitters of all ages and social positions with quiet dignity. Despite frequent time constraints, his created detailed and skillful watercolors. They’re not quite true portraits, in my opinion, but they were never intended to be. However, they far exceed the simple travelogue illustrations as they might have been in the hands of a different artist. Reserved but respectful, these watercolors are neither intimate nor impersonal.

Karl Bodmer placed much emphasis on his subjects’ often-elaborate clothing, jewelry, hairstyles, tattoos, and body paint. This focus played into his patron Prince Max’s ethnological interests. But, as we learn in the exhibition, personal adornment also carried great significance to the individuals depicted. It displayed their allegiances, celebrated their achievements, and indicated their places in society.

Karl Bodmer, Péhriska-Rúhpa, Hidatsa Man 1834, watercolor and graphite on paper, gift of the Enron Art Foundation, 1986, Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, NE, USA.
Karl Bodmer, Péhriska-Rúhpa, Hidatsa Man 1834, watercolor and graphite on paper, gift of the Enron Art Foundation, 1986, Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, NE, USA.

Cultural Insights

Prince Max’s extensive journals provide much information about Bodmer’s subjects and the circumstances of their portraits (one of the journals appears in the exhibition). Glimpses of these stories appear in the wall texts, which reveal the native sitters’ agency and active self-representation. From their diplomatic exchanges with Prince Max’s group to their choices about how Karl Bodmer portrayed them, they were by no means passive in the portrait-making process.

Alongside these more typical wall texts are even more interesting ones – those written by present-day Native Americans. Contributors include artists, scholars, descendants of the sitters, and other members of the communities depicted. Each text focuses on something different – beadwork, a coming-of-age ceremony, healing knowledge, etc. – either depicted or hinted at in the portraits.

Karl Bodmer, Cree Woman, 1833, watercolor and graphite on paper, gift of the Enron Art Foundation, 1986, Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, NE, USA.
Karl Bodmer, Cree Woman, 1833, watercolor and graphite on paper, gift of the Enron Art Foundation, 1986, Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, NE, USA.

The Exhibition

Obviously, the specter of colonialism hangs over an exhibition of a European artist’s images of Native Americans. As a result, every viewer will likely receive the Karl Bodmer portraits differently. Some may find them to be sensitive and respectful, while others may see them as uncomfortable or objectifying instead. Since it’s impossible to fully understand the dynamics of interactions that took place almost 200 years ago, all we can really do is look at the images and form our own opinions based on that. I appreciate, therefore, that The Met doesn’t try to tell visitors how to feel about this exhibition. I saw a decent amount of interest in this somewhat obscure artist during my recent visit.

Karl Bodmer: North American Portraits is on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s American Wing from April 5 to July 25, 2021, near a long-term display of Native-American art integrated with Euro-American art at The Met for the first time. It will then travel to the Joslyn Art Museum and the Amon Carter Museum in Texas.


Read more about this year’s art exhibitions:

Alexandra believes that enjoying the art of the past is the closest she can get to time travel, only much safer. When she’s not being an art historian, she can usually be found ice skating and dancing. Visit her at ascholarlyskater.com.

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