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Helena Sofia Schjerfbeck – A Female Finnish Gem

Women Artists

Helena Sofia Schjerfbeck – A Female Finnish Gem

I want to share with you my latest discovery: Helena Sofia Schjerfbeck, an unknown gem of Finnish painting. She began during the fine-de-siecle and painted until the late 1940’s. Her very idiosyncratic and personal style makes her difficult to categorize. Especially that it evolved throughout her life: some of her works are very Realist, others very Expressionistic. The Independent of London characterised her work as follows: “Imagine the life of Frida Kahlo yoked to the eye of Edvard Munch, and you’ll begin to get the measure of this oeuvre…”.

Realism

Dancing Shoes, 1882, Private collection

Dancing Shoes, 1882

This is probably her most famous painting as it fetched £3,044,500 at a 2008 Sotheby’s London sale. It depicts Helene’s cousin Esther, executed in a Realist style which shows the clear influence of Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas, Berthe Morisot, and Mary Cassatt. Esther had extremely long legs and for that reason the painting was nicknamed “The Grasshopper”.

Symbolism

Katkelma, 1905, Private collection

Katkelma, 1905


This portrait of a young girl bears influences of Klimt and his focus on female portraiture and golden backgrounds. The subtle rendering of the girl’s face suggest the ephemeral atmosphere accentuated by her closed eyes. Is she praying, is she dreaming? We can only guess what this painting means.

Expressionism

Self-Portrait With Black Mouth, 1939

Self-Portrait With Black Mouth, 1939

Very soon, however, Scherfbeck’s painting evolved from a melancholic Symbolism and Realism with impressionistic influences, to a very personal style, which carried the signs of Expressionism. This portrait is quite a late one, she died in 1946, but it brilliantly illustrates the radical change in Helen’s style. There is no room for dreaminess here, we have hard-cut lines of the distorted and simplified face,  whose unhealthy paleness is emphasized by the pink background.

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Magda, art historian and Italianist, she writes about art because she cannot make it herself. She loves committed and political artists like Ai Weiwei or the Futurists; like Joseph Beuys she believes that art can change us and we can change the world.

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