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Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street; Rainy Day

Gustave Caillebotte Paris Street Rainy Day
Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877, Art Institute of Chicago, detail.

Painting of the Week

Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street; Rainy Day

Paris Street; Rainy Day is probably the best known work of French artist Gustave Caillebotte (1848–1894). We see here a number of individuals strolling across the Place de Dublin, then known as the Carrefour de Moscou, at an intersection to the east of the Gare Saint-Lazare in north Paris. All of these individuals are not interacting with each other: nobody’s talking to anybody, everyone is a wandering atom, a nameless hero of the city universe.

According to art historians, the light indicates that the painting is set on a wintery afternoon. We see a couple with an umbrella, they seem rich. She wears a hat, veil, diamond earring, demure brown dress, and a very fashionable fur-lined coat. He wears a moustache, topcoat, frock coat, top hat, bow tie, starched white shirt, buttoned waistcoat and an open long coat with collar turned up. In the background, we see some working class figures: a maid in a doorway, a decorator carrying a ladder, cut-off by an umbrella above him.

 Gustave Caillebotte Paris Street Rainy Day Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877, Art Institute of Chicago

Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877, Art Institute of Chicago

Caillebotte’s interest in photography is evident here. He reproduces the effect of a camera lens in that the points at the center of the image seem to bulge. He also recreates the focusing effect of the camera in the way that it sharpens only certain subjects of an image. The foreground is in focus, while the background becomes more and more blurry. The painting’s highly crafted surface, rigorous perspective, and grand scale differed from what Impressionists were presenting at their exhibitions – it was much more pleasing for the Parisian audiences accustomed to the academic aesthetic of the official Salon. But at the same time, the asymmetrical composition and unusually cropped forms give us the feeling of something new, more modern. For these reasons, the painting dominated the celebrated Impressionist exhibition of 1877, largely organized by the artist himself.

 Gustave Caillebotte Paris Street Rainy Day Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877, Art Institute of Chicago, detail.

Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877, Art Institute of Chicago, detail.

While creating this masterpiece, he was a 29-year-old independent wealthy artist who was also financing many of his friends’ works. His father, Martial Caillebotte (1799–1874), had inherited family’s military textile business. This sizable allowance, along with the inheritance Gustave received after the death of his father and his mother, allowed him to paint without the pressure to sell his work.

Gustave Caillebotte Paris Street Rainy Day Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877, Art Institute of Chicago, detail.

Gustave Caillebotte, Paris Street; Rainy Day, 1877, Art Institute of Chicago, detail.

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Art Historian, founder and CEO of DailyArtMagazine.com and DailyArt mobile app. But to be honest, her greatest accomplishment is being the owner of Pimpek the Cat.

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