Theater & Cinema

Living the Dream – Movie-Inspired Interiors

Joanna Kaszubowska 26 March 2022 min Read

Sometimes when you watch a really good movie, wouldn’t you like to stay in that world for a bit longer? To walk around and really experience how it feels. Turns out it is possible. If only you’re motivated enough, you can turn your home into a movie-inspired interior and live the dream.

Thanks to a collaboration between Craig Anderson from Appliance Analysts and Melike Turkoglu, you can get a taste of what such a home could look like. Melike and Craig didn’t go for a literal recreation but rather used the atmosphere of the movies as their starting point and creatively developed the ideas. The results are wonderful, and while not all may be to your taste, they are so diverse you are certain to find at least one space you’d like to explore more.

The Matrix

The first of their movie-inspired interiors is timely, given the recent premiere of The Matrix: Resurrections. This design feels like living within endless lines of code, which may feel oppressive or actually liberating in its vastness, depending on how you look at this. It is split between a dark living room space, where the black furniture contrasts with green accents, and the more open dining space where floor-to-ceiling windows let in the entire city.

There is even an old-school rotary phone if one ever feels the need to urgently leave the Matrix. There is something very soothing in the clarity of vertical and horizontal lines—the simplicity of it. Taking a sneak peek at the bookshelf, living in the Matrix would mean you only read books with black spines. I wonder how having such an arbitrary limitation on the choice of reading matter would change the reading experience.

It is an interior that balances the safety of a hideaway with a breathtaking cityscape. Depending on your mood, you only have to take a few steps to enjoy either.

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Mad Max

You can make one dystopia work in an interior, but can you make two? Of course! And while those are two very different interiors, there are some topics that seem to link them.

The Mad Max living room is a lot warmer than The Matrix one, reflecting the scorched desert feel of the movie. Nonetheless, there isn’t much natural light coming in, the round window keeping out the direct glare. We abandon the computer vibe for more earthy tones, but keep the industrial feel.

There is almost no wood used. Everything is made of glass or metal, items that can be scavenged once civilization ends. And once civilization ends, you certainly need a drink, hence a well-stocked bar. Most of the furniture keeps in with the scavenger theme, repurposed from their previous functions (check out the side table made of a wheel). While it is very industrial, the warm light gives it a human touch, making it a space where you can imagine yourself unwinding after braving the dangers of the dystopian world outside.

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Kill Bill

Talking about danger, even Kill Bill characters have to rest sometimes. This interior blends the inspiration from the movie with more direct Japanese influences; the couch in the iconic yellow/black setup becomes the center around which the room revolves. Aiming to bring you calm and peace, all the distractions in the room have been removed, except for one painting and a buddha statue.

Simplicity is the key here, especially with all the windows opening the room to nature. Personally, I must say I’m missing the odd blood splatter, just to remind you of a job well done.

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The Lord of the Rings

Let’s move on to a world that is still unaware of the danger, living in blissful ignorance. The Bag End before the Fellowship started their quest. An interior made for enjoying life. The designers combine a space to relax, to entertain fellow hobbits, and a dedicated space for intellectual pursuits. It’s an interior that embodies the faith that life can be good. The trust towards the world has not been shaken yet. Huge windows and plenty of wood used within the design link back to nature, falling trustingly in its embrace.

The turquoise bookshelves provide the playful accent that counters the rustic coziness of the main room. It is a place where one can spend a good time just sitting and chatting with friends, remembering old times, and creating new memories.

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Amélie

This pervading trust in the goodness of the world was the key topic of the 2001 movie Amélie. Unlike the hobbits, Amélie lived in Paris. Nonetheless, the interior inspired by her adventures maintains that playful safety that could be seen a second ago. The colors become bolder, light changes to atmospheric laps, but it still feels like a place to snuggle comfortably. A place that says “all will be well” with the world.

Everything feels nice, pleasant, and normal, but the pig next to the couch also brings this playfulness and sense of joyful silliness. It turns it from a stately, opulent living room into a place full of possibility. The green and red color scheme also brings to mind the Christmas season, which could last all year round in this space.

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The Grand Budapest Hotel

Living in a city can be cozy, or it can be stylish. This living room is inspired by the lobby of The Grand Budapest Hotel. Every detail is perfectly curated, from the coordinated pink and gold color scheme to the perfect symmetry. This is an interior where comfort is almost secondary to style. It is also a room where you feel you really need those servants. A room where you graciously sit on a couch while everything gets served to you.

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While the interiors you’ve seen are designed end-to-end, there is nothing stopping anyone from incorporating some of the movie-inspired accents into their own homes. It is not about recreation but inspiration—not making a copy but conveying the feeling, even through the minor details.

What other movie interiors would you like to see? Do you have any movie-inspired elements in your homes?

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