fbpx
Connect with us

DailyArtMagazine.com – Art History Stories

Claude Monet, Autumn Effects at Argenteuil

Claude Monet Autumn Effects at Argenteuil
Claude Monet, Autumn Effects at Argenteuil, 1873, Courtauld Gallery, Courtauld Institute of Art, London, detail

Painting of the Week

Claude Monet, Autumn Effects at Argenteuil

Claude Monet painted Autumn Effects at Argenteuil in late 1873, which was the moment when the Impressionist movement started to roar on the Paris art scene. The subject is a view of Argenteuil, an expanding industrial centre in the suburbs of Paris.

Argenteuil was a frequent subject for many Impressionists because this little town, just a few miles from the French capital, was a popular weekend resort for yachting, boating and relaxation. Although at first glance the landscape might look untouched by humans, in the distance we see a factory chimney and an old church tower.

Claude Monet Autumn Effects at Argenteuil Claude Monet, Autumn Effects at Argenteuil, 1873, Courtauld Gallery, Courtauld Institute of Art, London

Claude Monet, Autumn Effects at Argenteuil, 1873, Courtauld Gallery, Courtauld Institute of Art, London

The picture was painted  out-of-doors in short and quick strokes, probably from Monet’s “Studio Boat” which was moored at Argenteuil. The artist reworked the composition many times and if we look at the right side of the painting, we can still see where he scraped away layers of paint from the trees, probably with the hard tip of his brush.

Claude Monet Autumn Effects at Argenteuil Utagawa Hiroshige I, Kai Province: Monkey Bridge (Kai, Saruhashi), from the series Famous Places in the Sixty-odd Provinces [of Japan] ([Dai Nihon] Rokujûyoshû meisho zue), 1853, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Utagawa Hiroshige I, Kai Province: Monkey Bridge (Kai, Saruhashi), from the series Famous Places in the Sixty-odd Provinces [of Japan] ([Dai Nihon] Rokujûyoshû meisho zue), 1853, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

The painting is full of vibrant colours of a sunny autumn day by the water when the leaves and the sky are reflected in the river Seine, a shocking visual effect for the audience of the time. The striking contrast between golden foliage and bright blue water can remind us of Japanese prints, especially Hiroshige’s Monkey Bridge in Kai Province (1853). Hiroshige’s blue water is framed asymmetrically by gold and green planes and so is Monet’s Seine placed between golden and green trees. The painting is on display in the Courtauld Gallery in London.

Find out more:

    

Art Historian, founder and CEO of DailyArtMagazine.com and DailyArt mobile app. But to be honest, her greatest accomplishment is being the owner of Pimpek the Cat.

Comments

More in Painting of the Week

  • Artists' Stories

    The Story of Vincent van Gogh’s Bedroom and Its Three Versions

    By

    The Bedroom(s) are among the most famous paintings of Vincent van Gogh. Why the plural? There are three similar paintings of the same title. All three versions are described in his letters, easily discernible from one another by the pictures on the wall to the right. The first,...

  • 20th century

    The Mysterious Road From Edvard Munch’s The Scream

    By

    The Scream by Edvard Munch is one of the most famous paintings in the world. It’s pretty obvious why – its expression and the way the pain and the anxiety of the man are depicted is universal for all human beings. We have all – at...

  • dailyart

    Painting of the Week: Saint George and the Dragon

    By

    There is a skirmish between the hero and the villain. Fabrics whip about, horse hoofs trample, and a dying scream erupts as Saint George slaughters the Dragon. The Christian saint kills the horrible creature as an act of religious zeal and civilization overcoming anarchy. Since the...

  • Cuno Amiet, Snowy Landscape Cuno Amiet, Snowy Landscape

    Painting of the Week

    Painting of the Week: Cuno Amiet, Snowy Landscape (Deep Winter)

    By

    These are the shortest days of the year in the Northern Hemisphere. It’s dark and cold outside, but there are two things which brighten the night – Christmas lights and snow, and this week’s painting is all about snow (and a lot of it!). This is...

  • dailyart

    Painting of the Week: Gentile da Fabriano, Adoration of the Magi

    By

    More than 2 billion people in more than 160 countries will celebrate Christmas this coming Friday. To mark this global Christian holiday, we explore a beautiful altarpiece which features scenes of great pomp and circumstance. Let us venture into the brilliant world of the International Gothic....

To Top