Connect with us

DailyArtMagazine.com – Art History Stories

Carl Larsson and His Cozy House

Artist

Carl Larsson and His Cozy House

It’s difficult to be a prophet in one’s own land… I guess the rule can apply to artists too. Carl Larsson, one of the most renowned Swedish painters nowadays, initially had no success in his country. Everything changed when he moved to a Scandinavian artistic community outside of Paris and apparently when he gave up oils for watercolors. But today’s story is not about prophecies but homes!

French Home

Carl Larsson, Garden in Grez, 1883, carl larsson house

Carl Larsson, Garden in Grez, 1883

Larsson moved to Paris in 1877. Initially, he found it very frustrating because he didn’t want to establish contact with the French Impressionists, nor he made any progress in his own career.  After spending two summers in Barbizon, he settled down with his colleagues in 1882 in Grez-sur-Loing where he met the artist Karin Bergöö.

Cozy Idylla

Carl Larsson, Brita and me, 1895, Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, Sweden carl larsson house

Carl Larsson, Brita and me, 1895, Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, Sweden

karin-and-brita-1893

Carl Larsson, Karin and Brita, 1893


Karin was also an artist but after the marriage, and bearing 8 children, she stopped working (so sad!). However, the family quickly became the centre of attention of Carl, too. His most successful works depict his house which nowadays is one of the most famous artist homes in art history. You can read more on the house’s website, here.

Carl Larsson, Getting Ready for a Game, 1901, Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, Sweden, carl larsson house

Carl Larsson, Getting Ready for a Game, 1901, Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, Sweden

Carl and Karin Larsson with children, Carl Larsson house

Carl and Karin Larsson with children

The couple received their house from Karin’s father. They kept redecorating it in a comfortable Arts and Crafts style. Karin focused on the textiles whereas Carl painted, also in the style of Aestheticism. His works gained popularity with the development of colour reproduction technology in the 1890s. One of the Swedish publishers, Bonnier, published books written and illustrated by Larsson which contained colour reproductions of his watercolors. Books became real bestsellers!

The Gallery as New House

Carl Larsson, Midwinter Sacrifice, 1915, Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, Sweden

Carl Larsson, Midwinter Sacrifice, 1915, Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, Sweden


Having become more successful, Larsson was accepted at the Paris Salon. He was also commissioned to complete several large frescoes for the foyer of the Stockholm Opera. However, the committee for the Swedish National Gallery declined to install Midwinter Sacrifice which showed a Norse legend and was to be installed in the hall of the central staircase. It left Larssen devastated because he considered it his best masterpiece. The Gallery accepted it 8 years later.

Attention!
After five years closed, the New Nationalmuseum at Blasieholmen opens again October 13, 2018. You will be able to see Carl Larsson’s artworks there.

Find out more:


Magda, art historian and Italianist, she writes about art because she cannot make it herself. She loves committed and political artists like Ai Weiwei or the Futurists; like Joseph Beuys she believes that art can change us and we can change the world.

Comments

More in Artist

  • 20th century

    Jeanne Hébuterne. Not Only a Muse but an Artist in Her Own Right

    By

    This post is not going to be about the tragic love story between Jeanne and Amedeo Modigliani (who wants to read about it, click here). This post is going to be about Jeanne the artist. Jeanne committed suicide at the age of 21. As Christie’s Paris...

  • Come out to play Clifford and Rosemary Ellis Come out to play Clifford and Rosemary Ellis

    20th century

    Take a Trip with Rosemary Ellis

    By

    As we head into summer holiday season, let’s take a look back at the gorgeous travel posters designed by British artist Rosemary Ellis. One of the most prominent illustrators of her age, Rosemary Ellis is not a household name – but she should be! Rosemary (maiden...

  • dailyart

    The Surrealistic World of Dora Maar

    By

    The name Dora Maar (1907 – 1997) reminds most people of Picasso. But as well as being his muse and lover, she was also an ambitious and progressive artist. Before they had even met, she was already known as a Surrealist photographer and stood up for...

  • Baroque

    Artemisia Gentileschi: A Changing Landscape for the Discourse of Art History

    By

    Much 16th and 17th century art focuses on mythological tropes and origin stories which are deeply embedded in misogyny and sexual violence. Gendered violence was aetheticised, rape heroised. In accordance with ‘the male gaze’, these were not paintings made for public collections. They were commissioned for...

  • Sir Lancelot of the Lake Sir Lancelot of the Lake

    dailyart

    Crossing the Sword Bridge. Sir Lancelot of the Lake in Medieval Art

    By

    The 12th century saw the rise of secular literature centred on heroes. Courtly poetry and prose took up themes of love and chivalry. These stories were the popular culture of the time, Sir Lancelot of the Lake being one of their best loved characters. Not only...

To Top

Just to let you know, DailyArt Magazine’s website uses cookies to personalise content and adverts, to provide social media features and to analyse traffic. Read cookies policy