fbpx
Connect with us

DailyArtMagazine.com – Art History Stories

Picasso Damaged at Tate Modern

Special Occasion And News

Picasso Damaged at Tate Modern

On the 28th of December 2019, a man from the public marred the Picasso painting, Bust of a Woman. The painting is on a long-term loan from a private collector and it has since been removed from public view for restoration. What is this painting about? Is the damage irreparable or can it be restored? Will the painting lose its value?

About the Painting

Picasso painted the Bust of a Woman in 1944, in his studio at Rue des Grands-Augustins. (He also painted Guernica there.) The painting was created during the last months of the Nazi occupation of Paris. It depicts Surrealist photographer Dora Maar, Picasso’s lover and muse. She is sitting on a black, metal chair and wearing a hat and bright green clothing.

Picasso, Buste de femme, 1944, oil on canvas, Tate Modern, London, UK,  © Succession Picasso/DACS 2019.
Picasso, Buste de Femme, 1944, oil on canvas, Tate Modern, London, UK, © Succession Picasso/DACS 2019.

The artist’s wartime work is mostly monochromatic. Yet this one is colorful, possibly because of prospects of liberation at the time. Maar’s nose and mouth are pointing in opposite directions and her face has hues of white, pink, and grey. It’s a semi-abstract portrait, one of the many Picasso made of Dora Maar.

On the day Picasso made this painting he created another, also entitled Bust of a Woman (private collection). The female figure in that version wears a taller hat. When seen together, the two portraits show how Picasso rethought the structure of the shoulders and the upper arms.

Damage & Value

Bust of a Woman costs £20 million (about $26.3 million USD). A Tate representative refused to comment on the condition of the painting, but it is allegedly torn. It is now undergoing restoration by the team at Tate Modern.

Experts say they the value of the painting, however, won’t necessarily diminish as long as it is restored to excellent condition. Brad Shar, vice president of Julius Lowy Frame and Restoring Co., New York, says that although a damaged painting is less valuable than before, it won’t inevitably sell for less.

After an art piece is damaged it usually depreciates 15% to 20%. Nevertheless, when it hits the market a few years later, it only takes one or two bidders to push up the price.

In any case, we hope that this painting will be restored soon. Meanwhile, you can read here about several masterpieces attacked through time!

Errika has a master’s degree in Modern and Contemporary History and dreams of becoming a curator. She writes articles about modern and contemporary art, fashion, and cinema. In her free time, she sculpts and paints miniatures and reads books.

Comments

More in Special Occasion And News

  • 20th century

    The Hidden Meanings of Nature in Čiurlionis’ Paintings

    By

    What’s nature like outside your window today? Is it calm and relaxing, or maybe there’s a frightening storm swaying the trees? Perhaps you are sitting in a cozy chair as the tree branches tap your window, tapping as if they were human… Mikalojus Konstantinas Čiurlionis (1875-1911)...

  • 20th century

    Christo and Jeanne-Claude: With Love through Art

    By

    If two people are born on precisely the same day, they must be destined to meet. He was Bulgarian, she was French. They met when he was called in to paint a portrait of her mother. They fell in love and began working together to create...

  • 20th century

    A Unique Artist Encounter: When Ara Güler Met Pablo Picasso

    By

    Whether photography is purely art or a branch of journalism can be a subject of discussion. For photographer Ara Güler, the artistic quality of his profession was definitely of secondary importance. He saw his photography projects as adventures that he took to document his age. One...

  • 20th century

    Dive into the World of Fairy Tales with Čiurlionis

    By

    Wouldn’t it be nice to immerse yourself in a fairy tale: hike among the heroes, fight monsters, visit enchanted lands? It would be a nice break from reality for sure. That is why today we present paintings that dwell in the fantasy world of fairy tales...

  • 20th century

    Living in the Shadow – Marie and Peder Severin Krøyer

    By

    Marie and Peder Severin Krøyer were a 19th and early 20th century couple, and, while their marriage and lives were far from ideal, history has judged them both to have been truly notable painters. When Peder Severin Krøyer met the young Marie, he was already an established...

To Top