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These 4 Mosques Will Make You Adore Islamic Architecture

Architecture

These 4 Mosques Will Make You Adore Islamic Architecture

At the moment, Islam is a difficult topic to talk about.
Yet art is beyond all that. We want to show you how beautiful and unique buildings Islam has created for us. Here are the wonders of Islamic architecture:

1. Great Mosque of Damascus

The_Great_Umayyed_Mosque_of_Damascus,_Syria_western_portico,_mosaic_depicting_a_continuous_landscape

Source: Wikimedia Commons. Western portico with a mosaic depicting a continuous landscape.

In 661, during the reign of the first Umayyad caliph Mu’awiya Ibn Abi Sufyan, the Muslims shared the church with the Christians. The Muslims prayed in the eastern section of the ancient temple structure and the Christians in the western side. Inside you can see many traces of Christian Byzantine art, like mosaics, and how they were adapted to their new role of mosque decorations.

2. Mezquita- The Great Mosque of Cordoba

Cordoba_Mezquita_02

Source: Wikimedia Commons. Mihrab in the Mezquita.


At the very beginning, Mezquita was most probably a Roman temple dedicated to god Janus. Then it was converted into a church and eventually, following the conquest of Spain by the Umayyads in 710, changed into a mosque. Then, in 13th cent., a Christian church was built inside the mosque by the emperor Charles V and since then it is again a Christian cathedral. Confusing.

3. Hagia Sophia

hagia sophia

Source: Wikimedia Commons. Interior of Hagia Sophia, Istanbul.

Hagia Sophia had a similar history. At first it was built as a Byzantine Orthodox church and then was converted into a mosque. Because of all the complications, it is now a secular building housing a museum.

4. Blue Mosque

PatioDeLaMezquitaDelSultánAhmed-rectangular

Source: Wikimedia Commons. The Sultan Ahmed Mosque, Istanbul.


The Sultan Ahmed Mosque is known by the name of Blue Mosque because of the hand-crafted blue tiles which cover its interior walls. At night, the mosque is beautifully lit by blue lights. It was built as a mosque in 1616 and after 400 years it’s still in use.

Do you know any other dazzling mosques? Let us know in the comment section!

Find out more:

     


Magda, art historian and Italianist, she writes about art because she cannot make it herself. She loves committed and political artists like Ai Weiwei or the Futurists; like Joseph Beuys she believes that art can change us and we can change the world.

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