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The Majestic Art of Alexander McQueen

Alexander McQueen, F/W 2009 Collection, Source: aeworld.

Fashion

The Majestic Art of Alexander McQueen

Champagne Supernova, as Maureen Callahan calls him in her book, Alexander McQueen, was a pioneer of the 90s fashion. Along with Marc Jacobs, he was one of the most influential designers of the industry, remembered for his raw and powerful shows and his theatrical designs. Today, we will see the inspiration behind the art of Alexander McQueen.

His life

Lee Alexander McQueen was born in 1969 in the East End of London. At the age of 16, he left school and worked for Savile Row and later for Gieves & Hawkes, where he learned tailoring. Gradually, he built his reputation as a fashion designer. In 1992, Alexander received his master’s degree in fashion design at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design. He attended the program after being encouraged by several people in the industry who saw his talent.

Alexander McQueen, Source: InfluentialDesigners.
Alexander McQueen, Source: InfluentialDesigners.

The collection he launched in 1992 was so amazing that Isabella Blow, an eccentric stylist of Vogue, purchased the whole line. She was also the one who convinced him to use the name Alexander as he was beginning his fashion career. Isabella and Alexander were very close friends, and Alexander always sought her advice and opinion. She had a significant impact on him. She was the only one who believed in him in the early stages of his career when everyone else called him “enfant terrible,” a reference to his chubbiness, and “a hooligan of English fashion” (Daily Telegraph).

Louis Vuitton and Gucci


In 1996, Givenchy, who owned the house of Louis Vuitton, approached Alexander McQueen. His technique fascinated them; he didn’t scratch design any clothes, but instead, he created them on the spot. He would take a pair of scissors and fabric, and he worked directly on the model. Louis Vuitton saw his process of adding garments and embroidery and chopping things off as true couture.

However, Alexander felt restricted at Louis Vuitton; he did not have the freedom to create what he wanted. So, in December of 2000, he left and started working for Gucci. They invested in Alexander, and the money allowed the artist to unfold his creativity.

The Alexander McQueen Brand & Inspiration Behind It


In 1992, Alexander had already founded his brand. He drew inspiration from everywhere: art, film, music. He paid tribute to Scorsese’s Taxi Driver and to Hitchcock’s The Birds and The Man Who Knew Too Much. Alexander opted for controversy and used shock-provoking tactics. He always meant to go political on his shows and broach various social and political issues. Each show had a different story to tell and had a unique title; the only common theme was the extravagance and drama.

Alexander McQueen's tribute to Hitchock's The Birds, F/W 2009. Source: Harper's Bazaar.
Alexander McQueen’s tribute to Hitchock’s The Birds, F/W 2009. Source: Harper’s Bazaar UK.
Alexander McQueen, The Horn of Plenty Collection, F/W 2009, Dress, black duck feathers, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, The Horn of Plenty Collection, F/W 2009, Dress, black duck feathers, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.

Alexander’s main goal was to reconnect the romantic past with the postmodern present. It proved, however, to be a difficult job. The postmodern present did not recognize beauty or craftmanship as relevant to art and culture. Besides, the conservative audience could not understand Alexander’s innovation.

Romanticism


Deeply inspired by romanticism, Lee was all about the lone artist. In 1992, he presented a show entitled Jack The Ripper Stalks His Victims, where he introduced his thorn-like overcoat and the three-point origami frockcoat.

Alexander McQueen, Jack The Ripper Stalks His Victims collection, Coat, ink silk satin printed in thorn pattern lined in white silk with encapsulated human hair, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Jack The Ripper Stalks His Victims collection, Coat, ink silk satin printed in thorn pattern lined in white silk with encapsulated human hair, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.

Victorian Era

The Victorian Era was a massive inspiration for Alexander. Specifically, he was into the gothic and the macabre. Plus, the Brothers Grimm fairytales fascinated him.


“People find my things sometimes aggressive. But I don’t see it as aggressive. I see it as romantic, dealing with a dark side of personality.”

– Alexander McQueen

The “shadowy fancies” that Edgar Alla Poe wrote in The Fall of the House of Usher also had a considerable impact on McQueen–details can be found in all of his collections. They are vividly present in his shows of F/W 1996-7 Dante, F/W 2002-3 Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, and F/W 2010-1 Angels and Demons. As the Victorian gothic combined elements of horror and romance, Alexander enjoyed making similar combinations of love and death, light and dark.

Snap of the Dante show, F/W 1996-7. Source: Harper’s Bazaar UK.
Alexander McQueen, Dante collection, F/W 1996-7, Coat, black wool felt embroidered with gold bullion cord, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Dante collection, F/W 1996-7, Coat, black wool felt embroidered with gold bullion cord, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen,  Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious collection, F/W 2002-3, Ensemble,  coat of black parachute silk; trouser of black synthetic; hat of black silk satin, hat by Philip Treacy for Alexander McQueen, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious collection, F/W 2002-3, Ensemble, coat of black parachute silk; trouser of black synthetic; hat of black silk satin, hat by Philip Treacy for Alexander McQueen, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Angels and Demons collection, F/W 2010-1, coat of gold feathers, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Angels and Demons collection, F/W 2010-1, coat of gold feathers, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.

London and Scotland


Another major inspiration was Alexander’s hometown, London, and Scotland, his family’s native homeland. His Scottish roots meant everything to him. Indeed, he used elements of Scottish culture several times in his collections. Moreover, he liked to make political statements regarding Scotland. That is the concept behind his very controversial collection Highland Rape of F/W 1995-6. The Daily Mail called him “the designer who hates women” because of the collection. Although Alexander insisted that it was a reference to England’s rape of Scotland, some hurried to characterize him as a misogynist. 

Alexander McQueen, Highland Rape collection, F/W 1995-6, Dress, green and bronze cotton/synthetic lace, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Highland Rape collection, F/W 1995-6, Dress, green and bronze cotton/synthetic lace, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Highland Rape collection, F/W 1995-6, Suit, jacket of McQueen wool tartan with green wool felt sleeves; skirt of McQueen wool tartan (the ensemble was not worn together on the runway), Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Highland Rape collection, F/W 1995-6, Suit, jacket of McQueen wool tartan with green wool felt sleeves; skirt of McQueen wool tartan (the ensemble was not worn together on the runway), Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.

The collection was based on the 18th century Jacobite Rising and the 19th century Highland Clearances. It was the first collection where Alexander used tartan. The models were semi-naked and blood-spattered, intending to provoke the audience’s sentiment. The Widows of Culloden was another collection where Alexander paid tribute to his motherland. 

Alexander McQueen, Widows of Culloden collection, F/W 2006-7, Dress, cream silk tulle and lace with resin antlers, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Widows of Culloden collection, F/W 2006-7, Dress, cream silk tulle and lace with resin antlers, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Widows of Culloden collection, F/W 2006-7, Ensemble, dress of McQueen wool tartan; top of nude silk net appliquéd with black lace; underskirt of cream silk tulle, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Widows of Culloden collection, F/W 2006-7, Ensemble, dress of McQueen wool tartan; top of nude silk net appliquéd with black lace; underskirt of cream silk tulle, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
 Alexander McQueen, Widows of Culloden collection, F/W 2006-7, Dress, pheasant feathers, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Widows of Culloden collection, F/W 2006-7, Dress, pheasant feathers, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.

But it wasn’t all about the disturbed and savage. Alexander embraced folklore and tradition, as well. In the collection The Girl Who Lived In A Tree, he used the history of England as an inspiration for fairytale pieces. 

Alexander McQueen, The Girl Who Lived In A Tree collection, F/W 2008-9, Ensemble, jacket of red silk velvet embroidered with gold bullion and trimmed with white shearling; dress of ivory silk tulle, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, The Girl Who Lived In A Tree collection, F/W 2008-9, Ensemble, jacket of red silk velvet embroidered with gold bullion and trimmed with white shearling; dress of ivory silk tulle, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, The Girl Who Lived In A Tree collection, F/W 2008-9, Ensemble, coat of red silk satin; dress of ivory silk chiffon embroidered with crystal beads, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, The Girl Who Lived In A Tree collection, F/W 2008-9, Ensemble, coat of red silk satin; dress of ivory silk chiffon embroidered with crystal beads, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.

Primitivism

“I try to push the silhouette. To change the silhouette is to change the thinking of how we look. What I do is look at ancient African tribes and the way they dress. The rituals of how they dress…There’s a lot of tribalism in the collections.”

– Alexander McQueen

Throughout his career, Alexander returned to the theme of primitivism several times. He saw a particular beauty in the image of the noble wildling, living in harmony with nature. It was also a means to express his disagreement with other designers who, according to him, did not respect ethnic apparel. They used expensive fabrics and created romanticized versions, which, the Masai, for example, would never wear.

Alexander McQueen, Irene collection, S/S 2003, Oyster Dress, Source: DazedDigital.
Alexander McQueen, Irene collection, S/S 2003, Oyster Dress, Source: DazedDigital.
Alexander McQueen, It's A Jungle Out There collection, F/W 1997-8, Ensemble, jacket of brown pony skin with impala horns; trousers of bleached denim, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, It’s A Jungle Out There collection, F/W 1997-8, Ensemble, jacket of brown pony skin with impala horns; trousers of bleached denim, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Eshy collection, F/W 2000-2, Ensemble, dress of beige leather; crinoline of metal wire, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Eshy collection, F/W 2000-2, Ensemble, dress of beige leather; crinoline of metal wire, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.

Naturalism

It comes as no surprise that nature influenced McQueen profoundly and enduringly. Fittingly, it was one of the central themes of Romanticism. Alexander was a firm believer in the artistic beauty of nature; it is a motive present in many of his runway shows.

Alexander McQueen, Sarabande collection, S/S 2007, Dress, nude silk organza embroidered with silk flowers and fresh flowers, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Sarabande collection, S/S 2007, Dress, nude silk organza embroidered with silk flowers and fresh flowers, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Sarabande collection, S/S 2007, Dress, cream silk satin and organza appliquéd with black degrade silk lace and embroidered in clear beads and sequins, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Sarabande collection, S/S 2007, Dress, cream silk satin and organza appliquéd with black degrade silk lace and embroidered in clear beads and sequins, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.

For Alexander, as well as for the Romantics, nature was a source of ideas and concepts. The influence of nature on his work is blatantly reflected in the collection Plato’s Atlantis of S/S 2010, his last fully realized collection before death. Inspired by Charles Darwin’s Origin of The Species (1859) but with a twist, the main subject of the show was the devolution of humankind, not the evolution. Technology took the place of nature’s majesty. Extreme space-time compressions produced by the internet replaced the natural and the pure. The collection is also an example of what McQueen thought would be the future of fashion.

Alexander McQueen, Plato's Atlantis collection, S/S 2010, Jellyfish Ensemble, dress, leggings, and “Armadillo” boots embroidered with iridescent enamel paillettes, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Plato’s Atlantis collection, S/S 2010, Jellyfish Ensemble, dress, leggings, and “Armadillo” boots embroidered with iridescent enamel paillettes, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Plato's Atlantis collection, S/S 2010, Dress, silk jacquard in a snake pattern embroidered with yellow enamel paillettes in a honeycomb pattern, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Alexander McQueen, Plato’s Atlantis collection, S/S 2010, Dress, silk jacquard in a snake pattern embroidered with yellow enamel paillettes in a honeycomb pattern, Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, USA.
Fashion meets sci-fi. The models looked like aliens, painted in silver and blue colors. They also had fake implants in their faces and shoulders, in order to look more extraterrestial. Source: DazedDigital.
Fashion meets sci-fi. The models looked like aliens, painted in silver and blue colors. They also had fake implants in their faces and shoulders, to look more extraterrestrial — source: DazedDigital.

The so-called “armadillo” shoes were something that caught everyone’s attention. Many thought the shoes were just a part of the show. Alexander, however, put his models in these extraordinarily high and glamorous but potentially harmful shoes because they were part of the whole concept— a live exhibition.

"Armadillo" shoes from Plato's Atlantis, S/S 2010. Source: Stylize.
“Armadillo” shoes from Plato’s Atlantis, S/S 2010. Source: Stylize.

An Inglorious End

Despite all of his success, McQueen was a deeply troubled person. He was sexually abused by his sister’s husband, without her knowing, and tragically uncomfortable in his skin, a situation that grew worse with the disapproval and condemnation of his detractors. Lee even went through surgery to look thinner, but the problem was fathomless at that point.

The first incident that shook him was the suicide of his beloved friend Isabella Blow in 2007. As the years had passed by, Isabella became more and more addicted to alcohol and drugs. She pulled away all from her friends and colleagues, including Alexander. Regardless, however far apart they were, and despite Isabella’s unacceptable behavior, Lee remained concerned. The news of Isabella’s suicide devastated him. He dedicated his S/S 2008 collection to her, as she was the one who discovered him and believed in him from the first moment.

Alexander McQueen and Isabella Blow. Source: Vanity Fair.
Alexander McQueen and Isabella Blow. Source: Vanity Fair.

The incident from which Alexander never recovered, though, was his mother’s death over cancer in 2010. A day before her funeral, Alexander was found dead in his apartment. He committed suicide by taking various anti-depressants, unable to cope with his pain any longer.

A Fashion Icon

Alexander McQueen was the epitome of a fashion artist. No matter what his shows depicted, women were always a significant inspiration for his work. The intention of all the dangerous accessories he put on his models was not to injure them; it was to create for them an armor. He wished to create warrior princesses— delicate, but powerful and fierce.

If you are interested in reading more about the art of Alexander McQueen, here are a few book suggestions:

Errika has a masters degree in Modern and Contemporary History and she is really into History of Art. Some of her favorite artists are Otto Dix, Zdzislaw Beksinski, Frida Kahlo and Vincent Van Gogh. In her free time, she reads literature, she listens to music, she enjoys a good old movie and she creates miniatures of macabre versions of classic fairytales.

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