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Painting of the Week: Claude Monet, Meules

Claude Monet, Meules (detail), 1890, private collection. Source: Sotheby's.

Painting of the Week

Painting of the Week: Claude Monet, Meules

Claude Monet, the master of Impressionism, loved to paint in series. The one with haystacks (in French called meules) is his most known one, as well the first he exhibited.

Fifteen of the paintings, presenting the haystacks in different times of the day, as well in different seasons, were exhibited at the Galerie Durand-Ruel (owned by the famous Impressionist art dealer) in 1891. In general, Monet painted 25 paintings with this subject. Today as Painting of the Week I would like to show you my favorite Haystacks painting. It is held in private hands (like 7 others from the series) and in 2019 it was sold at Sotheby’s for $110.7 million, which also set a new artist record.

Claude Monet Meules
Claude Monet, Meules, 1890, private collection. Source: Sotheby’s.

Monet had previously painted a single subject in different light and different moods. However, as he matured as a painter, his depictions of atmospheric influences were increasingly concerned not only with specific effects but with the overall color harmonies that allowed him an autonomous use of rich color. You must admit that in this particular Haystacks the color harmony is amazing.

But back to the painting itself. The year 1890 was a very important moment in Claude Monet’s life—he turned fifty and bought property for the first time. It was of course his famous house with the garden in Giverny. Meules were inspired in the fields adjacent to his home.

Claude Monet Meules
Claude Monet, Meules, 1890, private collection. Source: Sotheby’s.

Back in the days, in the French countryside each village there did not possess its own thresher, and the wait for one of these traveling machines to reach a specific location often took months—grain cut in the summer might sit in its neat and careful stack until January or February of the following year. These stacks were over ten feet (ca. 3 meters) in height, sometimes reaching over twenty feet (ca. 6 meters), their shape varying by region. The blond monoliths in Monet’s canvases possess the typical shape of the grain stacks in the Normandy countryside, a cylindrical base topped with a peaked dome, which lay all around him in the fields of Giverny.

Look at the unique perspective and dynamic composition of the Meules. Strong diagonal lines (one from the rightward-facing perspective, the other from slanted beams of sunlight) meet at the center of the work, grounding the layers of elaborate brushstrokes and guiding the viewer’s gaze across the canvas. Captivating!

Art Historian, founder and CEO of DailyArtMagazine.com and DailyArt mobile app. But to be honest, her greatest accomplishment is being the owner of Pimpek the Cat.

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