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Giovanni Boldini’s Beautiful Belles

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Giovanni Boldini’s Beautiful Belles

Giovanni Boldini (1842-1931) was a popular society portrait painter in turn-of-the-century France and England. His elegant portraits are still much appreciated today. He is best known for depicting gorgeous and fashionable women – mostly socialites, noble women, and actresses – in spectacular dresses.  His female portraits are full of life; his men are also striking but not usually as vibrant.

Consuelo Vanderbilt and Her Son by Giovanni Boldini

Giovanni Boldini, Consuelo Vanderbilt and Her Son, 1906, The Metropolitan Museum

Boldini must have really loved fashion, since most of his portraits feature evening gowns as least as prominently as the women wearing them. These dresses typically steal the show, but when you look at them closely, they seem to dissolve into near abstraction. Boldini was a master at using loose, flowing, swirling brushstrokes to indicate elegant silks and chiffons that take on a life of their own. The most recognizable feature of his style, this earned him the nickname “the Master of Swish”. He usually painted other sections of his works, such as sitters’ faces and elegant furniture, with more solidity, and this contrast only makes the fabrics that much more striking. His works are also recognizable for the subjects’ exaggerated pointed chins, bow-like red lips, elegant noses, and lithe hands and fingers held at jaunty angles.

Portrait of Rita de Acosta Lydig by Giovanni Boldini

Giovanni Boldini, Portrait of Rita de Acosta Lydig, 1911, private collection


Early in his career back in Italy, Boldini belonged to a group of artists, called the Macchiaioli, who experimented with nontraditional subjects and styles. They had much in common with the Impressionists, who also challenged artistic tradition. Boldini later became friends with several Impressionists; however, his society portraiture did not share most Impressionist values, despite a resemblance in brushwork. Boldini’s style and clientele had much more in common with his contemporary and friend John Singer Sargent, whose portrait he painted several times.

Let’s take a look some of Boldini’s most fashionable subjects.

Madame Eugène Doyen by Giovanni Boldini

Giovanni Boldini, Madame Eugene Doyen (1910), unknown location.

Emiliana Concha de Ossa by Giovanni Boldini

Giovanni Boldini, Emilana Concha de Ossa (1911), private collection.

Florence Blumenthal by Giovanni Boldini

Giovanni Boldini, Florence Blumenthal (1912), Brooklyn, New York, Brooklyn Museum.

La Marchesa Luisa Casati by Giovanni Boldini

Giovanni Boldini, La Marchesa Luisa Casati (1908), private collection.

Madame Juliard in Red by Giovanni Boldini

Giovanni Boldini, Madame Juliard in Red (1912), private collection.

Elizabeth Wharton Drexel by Giovanni Boldini

Giovanni Boldini, Elizabeth Wharton Drexel (1905), The Elms (Preservation Society of Newport), Newport, Rhode Island, U.S.

Sources


“Artist Biography”. The Sterling and Francine Clark Institute. Accessed October 1, 2017.

Steiner, Raymond J. “Giovanni Boldini at The Sterling and Francine Clark Institute”. Art Times. March-April 2010. Accessed October 1, 2017.


“Comprehensive and spectacular retrospective of the work of Giovanni Boldini on view in Rome”. Art Daily. (Date and author not given.) Accessed October 1, 2017.

Rau, Bill. “Spirited Masterpiece: Rita de Acosta Lydig by Giovanni Boldini”. Art Fix Daily. January 5, 2016. Accessed October 1, 2017.


Wallace, Natasha. “Giovanni Boldini (1845-1931) Italian-French portrait painter”. JSS Virtual Gallery. March 24, 2017. Accessed October 1, 2017.

“’The Master of Swish’ – Boldini’s Elegant Portraits of High Society Women”. 5 Minute History. (Date and author not given.) Accessed October 1, 2017.


Bonenti, Charles. “Rediscovering Giovanni Boldini”. The Berkshire Eagle. February 12, 2010. Accessed October 1, 2017.

Albinson, A. Cassandra. “Maximum Exposure: Modernizing the Grand Manner Portrait for the Edwardian Age” in Trumble, Angus & Andrea Wolk Rager eds. Edwardian Opulence: British Art at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century. New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 2013. P. 80-89.

“Catalogue” in Trumble, Angus & Andrea Wolk Rage eds. Edwardian Opulence: British Art at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century. New Haven & London: Yale University Press, 2013. P. 161-162.

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Alexandra Kiely is an art historian and writer from the United States. She believes that enjoying art is the closest you can get to time travel. She also loves reading, ice skating, and ballroom dance—all arts of a slightly different sort. Visit her at www.ascholarlyskater.com.

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