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If You’re Searching For A Path…

Seasons

If You’re Searching For A Path…

I have recently come across a tiny little poem by a Bulgarian poet, Blaga Dimitrova:

Grass


“I’m not afraid

They’ll stamp me flat

Grass stamped flat


Soon becomes a path…”

Sometimes it’s difficult to be yourself and go against the current. But it’s worth it.
This post comes a little bit late for the Coming Out Day, which was on the 11th October, but I still want to dedicate it to all those who have become paths for others…
Let’s see the best paths from art!

Walk with Klee

Paul Klee, Main path and byways, 1929, Museum Ludwig, paths from art

Paul Klee, Main path and byways, 1929, Museum Ludwig

Walk with Pissarro

Camille Pissarro, The path of Basincourt, 1884, private collection, paths from art

Camille Pissarro, The path of Basincourt, 1884, private collection

Walk with Monet

Claude Monet, The Sheltered Path, 1873, private collection, path

Claude Monet, The Sheltered Path, 1873, private collection

Walk with Sisley

Alfred Sisley, Hill Path, 1876, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Lyon, Lyon, France, paths from art

Alfred Sisley, Hill Path, 1876, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Lyon, France

Walk with Van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh, Path Through a Field with Willows, 1888, Private Collection, paths from art

Vincent van Gogh, Path Through a Field with Willows, 1888, Private Collection

Walk with Renoir

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Path through the High Grass, c.1876, Private Collection, paths from art

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Path through the High Grass, c.1876, Private Collection

Walk with Roerich

Nicholas Roerich, The straight path, 1912, Nizhny Novgorod State Museum of Fine Arts , Russia, paths from art

Nicholas Roerich, The straight path, 1912, Nizhny Novgorod State Museum of Fine Arts , Russia

Walk with Twachtman

John Henry Twachtman, Path in the Hills, Branchville, Connecticut, c.1888 - c.1891, Private Collection, paths from art

John Henry Twachtman, Path in the Hills, Branchville, Connecticut, c.1888 – c.1891, Private Collection


If you feel lost, or at the crossroads, I hope these paths from art will lead you to a better place, an awaited decision, an answer…

Magda, art historian and Italianist, she writes about art because she cannot make it herself. She loves committed and political artists like Ai Weiwei or the Futurists; like Joseph Beuys she believes that art can change us and we can change the world.

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