fbpx
Connect with us

DailyArtMagazine.com – Art History Stories

Yayoi Kusama and Her World of Polka Dots

Yayoi Kusama, Dots Obsession, Infinity mirrored Room, 1998. Installation. Les Abattoirs, Toulouse, France.

Women Artists

Yayoi Kusama and Her World of Polka Dots

Yayoi Kusama is a Japanese artist and writer, born in 1929. Well-known for her repeating dot patterns, her art encompasses an astonishing variety of media, including painting, drawing, sculpture, film, performance and immersive installation. It ranges from works on paper featuring intense semi-abstract imagery, to soft sculpture known as ‘Accumulations’, to her ‘Infinity Net’ paintings, made up of carefully repeated arcs of paint built up into large patterns.

But we are here to tell you about her obsession with polka dots.

Since 1977 Kusama has lived voluntarily in a psychiatric institution, and much of her work has been marked with obsessiveness and a desire to escape from psychological trauma. In an attempt to share her experiences, she creates installations that immerse the viewer in her obsessive vision of endless dots and nets or infinitely mirrored space.

Yayoi Kusama polka dots Yayoi-Kusama-In-Infinity-louisiana-museum-of-modern-art-1
Yayoi Kusama

At the centre of the art world in the 1960s, she came into contact with artists including Donald Judd, Andy Warhol, Joseph Cornell and Claes Oldenburg, influencing many along the way. She has traded on her identity as an ‘outsider’ in many contexts – as a female artist in a male-dominated society, as a Japanese person in the Western art world, and as a victim of her own neurotic and obsessional symptoms.

Yayoi Kusama polka dots All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins by Yayoi Kusama (Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo / Singapore and Victoria Miro, London. © Yayoi Kusama)
All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins by Yayoi Kusama (Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo / Singapore and Victoria Miro, London. © Yayoi Kusama)

After achieving fame and notoriety with groundbreaking art happenings and events, she returned to her country of birth and is now Japan’s most prominent contemporary artist.

In September 2017 in Tokyo, the museum dedicated to her work was opened. It is operated by a foundation she created to support the display of her paintings and immersive installations even after her death.

If you enjoyed reading about the artist who published the message to Covid-19, check these articles:

Art Historian, founder and CEO of DailyArtMagazine.com and DailyArt mobile app. But to be honest, her greatest accomplishment is being the owner of Pimpek the Cat.

Comments

More in Women Artists

  • 20th century

    Rosalyn Drexler: Wrestling Feminist in the Pop Art World

    By

    Rosalyn Drexler is an American artist born in the Bronx, New York, in 1926. She attended the High School of Music and Art in New York City before marrying American painter, Sherman Drexler. She began making sculptures in the 1950s and later explored painting and Pop...

  • Louise Bourgeois, Spider, 1994, Bronze, silver nitrate and brown patina, and granite. The Art Newspaper. Louise Bourgeois, Spider, 1994, Bronze, silver nitrate and brown patina, and granite. The Art Newspaper.

    dailyart

    10 Great Women Sculptors You Should Know

    By

    Sculpture is a very impressive form of art, dating back to ancient times. Just like traditional painting, art history has acknowledged only male sculptors. However, that doesn’t mean that women haven’t made powerful statements through sculpture. As we embrace change and move forwards, more women artists...

  • Impressionism

    Mary Cassatt’s Feminist Mural Which Has Gone Missing

    By

    Mary Cassatt is a well-known Impressionist who often illustrated motherhood and traditional female activities in the 19th century. However, when she was 50, she received a commission that shed a new light on her entire oeuvre: a mural presenting a Modern Woman. The story began with the 1893...

  • 19th Century

    Painting of the Week: Claude Raguet Hirst, A Gentleman’s Table

    By

    A Gentleman’s Table by Claude Raguet Hirst is a mysterious painting that echoes the realism of Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, and Henry Ossawa Tanner. It explores both the dignity and the immorality of ordinary life. It depicts the human experience of the late 19th century United...

  • May Alcott Nieriker, May's Salon, 1878. Orchard House, MA, USA May Alcott Nieriker, May's Salon, 1878. Orchard House, MA, USA

    19th Century

    May Alcott, an Artist Born Under a Lucky Star

    By

    Abigail May Alcott Nieriker was the real Amy March from Little Women. However, she was so much more than an inspiration. Born under a lucky star, she earned praise from the toughest art critics. Moreover, she fought for social and gender equality in artistic education. Her...

To Top