Connect with us

DailyArtMagazine.com – Art History Stories

Yayoi Kusama and Her World of Polka Dots

Yayoi Kusama, Dots Obsession, Infinity mirrored Room, 1998. Installation. Les Abattoirs, Toulouse, France.

Women Artists

Yayoi Kusama and Her World of Polka Dots

Yayoi Kusama is a Japanese artist and writer, born in 1929. Well-known for her repeating dot patterns, her art encompasses an astonishing variety of media, including painting, drawing, sculpture, film, performance and immersive installation. It ranges from works on paper featuring intense semi-abstract imagery, to soft sculpture known as ‘Accumulations’, to her ‘Infinity Net’ paintings, made up of carefully repeated arcs of paint built up into large patterns.

But we are here to tell you about her obsession with polka dots.

Since 1977 Kusama has lived voluntarily in a psychiatric institution, and much of her work has been marked with obsessiveness and a desire to escape from psychological trauma. In an attempt to share her experiences, she creates installations that immerse the viewer in her obsessive vision of endless dots and nets or infinitely mirrored space.

Yayoi Kusama polka dots Yayoi-Kusama-In-Infinity-louisiana-museum-of-modern-art-1
Yayoi Kusama

At the centre of the art world in the 1960s, she came into contact with artists including Donald Judd, Andy Warhol, Joseph Cornell and Claes Oldenburg, influencing many along the way. She has traded on her identity as an ‘outsider’ in many contexts – as a female artist in a male-dominated society, as a Japanese person in the Western art world, and as a victim of her own neurotic and obsessional symptoms.

Yayoi Kusama polka dots All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins by Yayoi Kusama (Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo / Singapore and Victoria Miro, London. © Yayoi Kusama)
All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins by Yayoi Kusama (Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo / Singapore and Victoria Miro, London. © Yayoi Kusama)

After achieving fame and notoriety with groundbreaking art happenings and events, she returned to her country of birth and is now Japan’s most prominent contemporary artist.

In September 2017 in Tokyo, the museum dedicated to her work was opened. It is operated by a foundation she created to support the display of her paintings and immersive installations even after her death.


If you enjoyed reading about the artist who published the message to Covid-19, check these articles:

Art Historian, founder and CEO of DailyArtMagazine.com and DailyArt mobile app. But to be honest, her greatest accomplishment is being the owner of Pimpek the Cat.

Comments

More in Women Artists

  • dailyart

    Five Women Artists Whose Works Were Misattributed to Men

    By

    “Why have there been no great female artists?” continues to be a question that pops up all too often. The response can be succinctly summarized like this: female artists have existed for centuries, but we just haven’t been aware of them. There are plenty of reasons...

  • 21st century

    An Interview with Emily Thomas

    By

    Emily Thomas is a 24 year old, British, emerging artist. At first glance, her bright and vibrant sculptural work is distinctive and abstract. In a previous article, Exploring Place with Emily Thomas, we looked at Thomas’ artworks from Tainan, Berlin, and London. In the following interview we...

  • Begum Rokeya Begum Rokeya

    Contemporary Art

    Chitra Ganesh Visualizes Sultana’s Dream by Begum Rokeya

    By

    Chitra Ganesh’s Sultana’s Dream exhibition at the Memorial Art Gallery (MAG), University of Rochester, attributes a few pivotal reasonings to artworks, which carry the weight of idealism and redemption. The radical artist has exhibited 27 linocuts, depicting illustrative representations of Begum Rokeya or Rokheya Sakhawat Hossain’s...

  • Bodies And Erotic Art

    Richard Saltoun Gallery: Bodily Objects – Review

    By

    Bodily Objects, curated by Philomena Epps, Richard Saltoun Gallery, London. 1.05.2020 – 30.06.2020, access online viewing room here. The business of an online exhibition is certainly very topical. You would be forgiven six weeks ago for completely ignoring the emails of a gallery promoting their latest...

  • dailyart

    It’s True, It’s True, It’s True: Artemisia on Trial Goes Online!

    By

    With museums and theaters closed, drama and art are having a hard time during quarantine. However, both these sectors have the chance of reinventing themselves. That is what the theater company Breach had already done, ahead of time; they combined art and drama in It’s true,...

To Top

Just to let you know, DailyArt Magazine’s website uses cookies to personalise content and adverts, to provide social media features and to analyse traffic. Read cookies policy