Women Artists

Yayoi Kusama and Her World of Polka Dots

Zuzanna Stańska 15 April 2020 min Read

Yayoi Kusama is a Japanese artist and writer, born in 1929. Well-known for her repeating dot patterns, her art encompasses an astonishing variety of media, including painting, drawing, sculpture, film, performance and immersive installation. It ranges from works on paper featuring intense semi-abstract imagery, to soft sculpture known as ‘Accumulations’, to her ‘Infinity Net’ paintings, made up of carefully repeated arcs of paint built up into large patterns.

But we are here to tell you about her obsession with polka dots.

Since 1977 Kusama has lived voluntarily in a psychiatric institution, and much of her work has been marked with obsessiveness and a desire to escape from psychological trauma. In an attempt to share her experiences, she creates installations that immerse the viewer in her obsessive vision of endless dots and nets or infinitely mirrored space.

Yayoi Kusama polka dots Yayoi-Kusama-In-Infinity-louisiana-museum-of-modern-art-1
Yayoi Kusama

At the centre of the art world in the 1960s, she came into contact with artists including Donald Judd, Andy Warhol, Joseph Cornell and Claes Oldenburg, influencing many along the way. She has traded on her identity as an ‘outsider’ in many contexts – as a female artist in a male-dominated society, as a Japanese person in the Western art world, and as a victim of her own neurotic and obsessional symptoms.

Yayoi Kusama polka dots All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins by Yayoi Kusama (Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo / Singapore and Victoria Miro, London. © Yayoi Kusama)
All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins by Yayoi Kusama (Courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo / Singapore and Victoria Miro, London. © Yayoi Kusama)

After achieving fame and notoriety with groundbreaking art happenings and events, she returned to her country of birth and is now Japan’s most prominent contemporary artist.

In September 2017 in Tokyo, the museum dedicated to her work was opened. It is operated by a foundation she created to support the display of her paintings and immersive installations even after her death.

If you enjoyed reading about the artist who published the message to Covid-19, check these articles:

https://www.dailyartmagazine.com/pumpkins-kusama/
https://www.dailyartmagazine.com/kusamas-narcissus-garden/

Recommended

Women Artists

Nives Kavuric-Kurtovic: Pushing the Limits of Surrealism

Nives Kavuric-Kurtovic was the first female Croatian Surrealist painter and one of the greatest artists of Croatian contemporary art. As a painter,...

Guest Profile 6 January 2022

Slava Raskaj, Ozalj, Croatia Women Artists

Slava Raškaj, The Story of a Deaf Impressionist Watercolorist

In the final years of the 19th century, the art scene in Zagreb, Croatia, was pretty vibrant. The various ideas circulated among artists occasionally...

Lana Pajdas 13 December 2021

Women Artists

Joan Hill: Art that Communicates Heritage

On December 19, 1930 in Muskogee, Oklahoma, Joan Hill was born into an influential family of Creek and Cherokee descent. After dabbling in art during...

Abreeza Thomas 27 November 2021

Blazing Star (Mentzelia laevicaulis) Women Artists

Mary Vaux Walcott: An American Artist and Naturalist

An artist and naturalist, Mary Vaux Walcott was an extraordinary and accomplished woman. Sometimes called ” the Audubon of Botany”, she...

Alexandra Kiely 4 November 2021