Connect with us

DailyArtMagazine.com – Art History Stories

Jacob Lawrence and The Great Migration

20th century

Jacob Lawrence and The Great Migration

As a child of ‘The Great Migration’, Jacob Lawrence was well placed to undertake such a mammoth task in detailing the journey from the rural south that over six million African Americans undertook from 1916 onwards to supply a workforce for the growing industries of North America.

The involvement of the United States in World War One meant that the industries supplying the war machine were in dire need of more workers.  In the South, floods and diseases were wiping out whole crops and the discrimination faced by African Americans forced many of them to make the journey to what they saw to be a more prosperous and fairer way of life. The risks were high, but many of the migrants felt that they could achieve a better way of life, better education, social mobility and, most importantly, personal freedom.


For a time, this was the case, but as more migrants arrived in the North, the Midwest and the West of the country, the reality was not quite as positive as had been earlier described.  Overcrowded housing, discrimination and poor working conditions meant that life was just as difficult here as in the South, with race riots breaking out; the most serious being Chicago in 1919 that left 38 people dead, 537 injured and 1,000 black families homeless.

One of the outcomes was the setting up of black communities within cities with Harlem, in New York City, as an example of this. The experiences of the migrants brought about “The Harlem Renaissance”: the rise of African American culture through the arts, music and literature.


Born in 1917 in Atlantic City, New Jersey to parents from the southern states, Lawrence discovered a love of art following the move to Harlem in 1930 with his mother and sister. Here, Lawrence experienced first hand what it meant to be part of a cultural movement.  His love of art brought him to combine story telling with the techniques he employed.  Lawrence wanted to tell the story of his family and the millions of other people who travelled in the hope of a better life.

In Lawrence’s own words:


“To me, migration means movement. There was conflict and struggle. But out of the struggle came a kind of power and even beauty. ‘And the migrants kept coming’ is a refrain of triumph over adversity. If it rings true for you today, then it must still strike a chord in our American experience.”

In 1940, Lawrence created 60 panels that tell the story of The Great Migration.  Each one was given a caption that told the story in a lyrical format.  Repetition, sentence length, punctuation, all combined to give a rhythmic feel to the story. In addition, Lawrence used the wide angle approach to show landscapes, followed the curve of a railway track and focused in on detail in the way a film maker might do.   The use of tempera, which dries quickly, gives a reminiscent feel of Renaissance fresco painting, further emphasised by the flattened planes.  Unusually, Lawrence painted one hue at a time which meant that all 60 canvases were worked on at the same time. Lawrence used a limited palette of bright colours, using the paint to deliver a symphony of colour and brushstrokes, giving the work a ‘jazz-like’ feel to it, as these examples demonstrate:


Panel 1

During World War 1 there was a great migration north by southern African Americans.

01

1940–41, Casein tempera on hardboard, 12 x 18 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1942


Panel 31

The migrants found improved housing when they arrived north.

TPC_Panel31_900

1940–41, Casein tempera on hardboard, 12 x 18 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1942

Panel 38

They also worked the railroads.

MOMA_PANEL38_900

1940–41, Casein tempera on hardboard, 12 x 18 in. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Mrs. David M. Levy

Panel 46

Industries boarded their workers in unhealthy quarters. Labor camps were numerous.

MOMA_PANEL46_900

1940–41, Casein tempera on hardboard, 18 x 12 in. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Mrs. David M. Levy

Panel 49

The found discrimination in the North. It was a different kind.

TPC_Panel49_900

1940–41, Casein tempera on hardboard, 18 x 12 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1942

Panel 50

Race riots were numerous, White workers were hostile towards the migrants who had been hired to break strikes.

MOMA_PANEL50_900

1940–41, Casein tempera on hardboard, 18 x 12 in. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Mrs. David M. Levy

Panel 58

In the North the African American had more educational opportunities.

MOMA_PANEL58_900

1940–41, Casein tempera on hardboard, 12 x 18 in. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Mrs. David M. Levy

Panel 60

And the migrants kept coming.

MOMA_PANEL60_900

1940–41, Casein tempera on hardboard, 12 x 18 in. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Mrs. David M. Levy

1940–41, Casein tempera on hardboard, 12 x 18 in. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Mrs. David M. Levy

 

For more information

     

 

 

Teacher by trade; art lover by choice. Like all manner of artists and movements but somehow always end up back in 1910!

Comments

More in 20th century

  • I was a Rich Man's Plaything 1947 by Sir Eduardo Paolozzi 1924-2005 I was a Rich Man's Plaything 1947 by Sir Eduardo Paolozzi 1924-2005

    dailyart

    Painting of the Week: Eduardo Paolozzi, I was a Rich Man’s Plaything

    By

    Eduardo Paolozzi’s 1947 collage I was a Rich Man’s Plaything, which can be seen in the Tate Modern in London, was one of the first works of Pop Art and even contains the word ‘POP!’ Eduardo Paolozzi was born in 1924 in Leith, a port in...

  • 20th century

    Black Is Beautiful: Kwame Brathwaite at the Skirball Center

    By

    Let’s play a game: pick up any magazine from a U.S. newsstand and count how many people of color are featured. Now try playing with a magazine from the 1950’s. Depending on which magazine you chose, the difference may not be all that striking. But the...

  • Cubism

    Tarsila do Amaral: Joy Is the Decisive Test

    By

    Tarsila do Amaral left behind 230 paintings, five sculptures, and hundreds of drawings, prints and murals. She led Brazilian art into modernism. In her home country, she is a household name.  She was a socialite, fashionista, divorcee, who lived how she wanted. She was adored and...

  • 20th century

    It’s Not Always What It Seems: The Fabulous Inventions of Panamarenko

    By

    Panamarenko steals from science and uses it in his art. He has designed planes and submarines that at first sight are perfectly capable of functioning, but don’t be misled: they are unique works of art that should be admired, not used. The Inspiration Started with Choosing...

  • Lee Krasner Gaea Lee Krasner Gaea

    20th century

    Lee Krasner and the Art of Starting Over

    By

    Lee Krasner’s name has become much more widely known in recent years. Often referred to as the wife of Jackson Pollock, she was, of course, a great artist in her own right. The Barbican Gallery in London is currently holding the biggest presentation of her work...

To Top

Just to let you know, DailyArt Magazine’s website uses cookies to personalise content and adverts, to provide social media features and to analyse traffic. Read cookies policy